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Next Level Recovery Data Dashboard

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Explore the Data

Learn more about the Data  

County Response, Hospital Discharges, and Deaths 

To review information on data, definitions, and methods for the County Response, Hospital Discharge, and Death sections of the Next Level Recovery Dashboard please review the Drug Overdose Dashboard Data Notes from the Indiana Department of Health’s (IDOH) overdose prevention website. To review these dashboards directly at the Indiana Department of Health’s (IDOH) Overdose Prevention website.  

Note: Additional county response data was included by the next level recovery team that is only visible on the Next Level Recovery Dashboard but not on the overdose prevention dashboards at the IDOH site.

Prescriptions 

Data Source: Indiana Scheduled Prescription Electronic Collection and Tracking (INSPECT) 
Providing Entity: Indiana Professional Licensing Agency (PLA) 
Data Refresh: Weekly from a direct connection 
Date Range: 2012-Present 
Brief Description: This data provides insight on prescriptions of controlled substances (or drugs of concern/abuse potential) in the State of Indiana. Use the dashboards to see dispensation information by time, place, and drug class.  

Additional Notes:  

  • Definitions: 
    • A prescription is the unique combination of a pharmacy identifier and a prescription identifier generated by the pharmacy. 
    • A dispensation is the unique combination of a prescription and the date a pharmacy fills it. 
    • A co-occurance is a dispensation of one drug type within the range of fill date + days supply of another drug type. 
    • Co-occurances are defined for opioids, benzodiazepines and skeletal muscle relaxants of concern (cyclobenzaprine & carisoprodol) 
  • NDC: 
    • The National Drug Code (NDC) is recorded for each dispensation; using the NDC identifier, properties of the drug (including brand name, generic name, ingredients, drug class, dose form, and strength) can be determined from information provided by the FDA and CDC. 
  • Tramadol and Gabapentin: 
    • Tramadol became scheduled on August 18, 2014. 
    • Indiana considers Gabapentin a "drug of concern". 2019 Indiana legislature requires dispensers to report dispensations to INSPECT starting July 1, 2019.  Gabapentin is scheduled in many states including Ohio and Kentucky. So prior to July 1, other states that were mandated to report Gabapentin would have reported dispensations to Indiana residents, but Indiana dispensers had no reason to do so.  
  • ZIP Codes and Counties:  
    • The county of the patient, practitioner, and pharmacy are not provided in the source data but are derived from ZIP codes. For ZIP codes that cross county boundaries, the county with the highest proportion of the ZIP code's population is used. 
    • Results for Benton, Fountain, Martin, Ripley, and White counties are likely high because of this method. Results for Brown, Carroll, Franklin, Hendricks, Newton, Morgan, Ohio, Posey, Tipton, and Warren counties are likely low because of this method.  

Naloxone 

Data Source: NEMSIS v2 and v3 
Providing Entity: Indiana Department of Homeland Security (IDHS) 
Data Refresh: Daily 
Date Range: 2014-Present 
Brief Description:  This dashboard provides insight into naloxone events reported by Emergency Medical Services (EMS) providers throughout the State of Indiana. Indiana EMS providers report locations of patient encounters during which naloxone was administered when an opioid overdose was suspected.  The drug, also known by the brand name Narcan, reverses the effects of an opioid overdose and is administered with the intent to save the life of the patient.  The Naloxone Dashboard shows naloxone administrations as reported by EMS provider agencies since January 1, 2014.  

Additional Notes: 

  • EMS data is submitted by EMS provider agencies in the NEMSIS v2 or v3  
  • Click on the following links to learn more about NEMSIS v2, v3, the Indiana Department of Homeland Security, and the Indiana Department of Health’s response.  
  • Depending on the EMS provider, it can take anywhere from 24 hours to 6 weeks for the data to be accepted into the database.   
  • The EMS data is analyzed by the Indiana Management Performance Hub (MPH) 
  • EMS incidents are attributed to the county where the incident took place, not the patient’s county of residence. 
  • As of March 2019, EMS providers are required to report to the State of Indiana all EMS events within a 24 hour time period.  
  • Not all patient encounters during which naloxone is administered are overdose events.  Preliminary analysis indicates approximately 75% of naloxone incidents are likely actual overdose events.  
  • The gray vertical bar on the incident line graph depicts a software system/reporting change to the data, therefore it may appear there was a decrease in incidents, however the data quality (accuracy and volume of incidents reported) significantly improved.  
  • Naloxone is a drug that reverses the effects of opioids and can be administered when a person shows symptoms of an overdose, such as respiratory depression.  When administered, a person typically shows a response to the naloxone within minutes, but may require additional doses depending on the severity of the opioid overdose.  The dashboard displays such situations where multiple doses are administered as one incident.  Naloxone is NOT a substitute for medical attention.  More information can be found at the Indiana State Department of Health website (ISDH) (Link Below). Naloxone is often administered when the patient is unresponsive, not breathing, and drug use is suspected.  Analysis by MPH and IDHS suggests that approximately 75% of individuals given naloxone were experiencing an opioid overdose, while 25% were most likely not experiencing an overdose. 

Arrests 

Data Source: Criminal History Repository Information System (CHRIS) 
Providing Entity: Indiana State Police (ISP) 
Data Refresh: Daily 
Date Range: 1/1/2008-Present 
Brief Description: This dashboard aims to uncover insights and trends local to counties and/or time periods related to the opioid epidemic and other public safety concerns. Use the dashboard to see counts of individuals arrested, arrests, or charges by offense category, county, and time period.  

Additional Notes: 

  • Data feeding into the CHRIS system comes from three main sources. Arrest data come from the LiveScan system, which is used for fingerprinting and capturing other pertinent information at the time of the arrest. Criminal disposition data are maintained by prosecutors in ProsLink system, and by courts in the Odyssey system. 
  • Arrest data are sent to ISP soon after the arrest occurs, but disposition data have a lag of approximately seven months as the case makes its way through the legal system. 
  • Text descriptions of the original offenses are provided by the arresting officer when the alleged offender is arrested. Later, the prosecutor's office or court provides a text description of the filed offenses, along with the Indiana Code title, article, chapter, and section (e.g.35-48-4-6). The filed offense may be amended later. 
  • Use the "Offense Stage" filter on the CHRIS dashboard to show only the original offenses alleged at the time of arrest (Note: this will show most recent data, but may not provide an accurate picture of final offenses), only the dispositioned offenses (filed or amended)(Note: this will show an accurate picture of final offences, but there will be a lag in the data) or the "most recent" offenses (arrest or dispositioned). 
  • If offense charges were dropped between arrest and disposition, it does not necessarily mean the case was dismissed. In many cases, plea bargains are reached and not all offense charges are filed, but sentencing is determined based upon the original charges and the severity of the offense. 
  • Arrest county is determined by the location of the booking agency. If the booking agency is missing, then the arresting agency is used. 
  • The count of individuals/arrests/charges by offense category can add up to more than the grand total because one individual/arrest/charge can fall into multiple categories (e.g. DUI is counted in the "Drug" and "Traffic" categories). 
  • Arrest categories and subcategories are determined based on keywords found in a free text description of the offense. About 7% of offenses have a description that has not yet been categorized. More effort was spent categorizing "Drug" and "Traffic" offenses, so other categories are likely to have a larger percentage of arrests that have not yet been categorized.  

Re-Arrest Dashboard 

Providing Entity: Indiana Department of Correction (DOC) and Indiana State Police (ISP) 
Data Refresh: Annual 
Date Range: 2013-2019 
Brief Description: This dashboard is meant to analyze DOC release outcomes for different populations coming out of the corrections system 

Additional Notes: 

  • Re-arrest rates are given for a cohort of releases within a given year. Re-arrest rate is calculated based upon the number of individuals released that had an arrest within a year of their release date. 
  • County is based upon county of commitment. 
  • Parole violations (& possibly probation violations) are not captured in ISP arrest data & will therefore be under represented in this dashboard. 
  • Arrest data comes from the Criminal History Repository System (CHRIS). Data feeding into the CHRIS system comes from three main sources. Arrest data come from the LiveScan system, which is used for fingerprinting and capturing other pertinent information at the time of the arrest. Criminal disposition data are maintained by prosecutors in ProsLink system, and by courts in the Odyssey system. 
  • Arrest data are sent to ISP soon after the arrest occurs, but disposition data have a lag of approximately seven months as the case makes its way through the legal system. 
  • Text descriptions of the original offenses are provided by the arresting officer when the offender is arrested. Later, the prosecutor's office or court provides a text description of the filed offenses, along with the Indiana Code title, article, chapter, and section (e.g.35-48-4-6). The filed offense may be amended later. 
  • This dashboard uses the "most recent" offenses (arrest or dispositioned). 
  • If offense charges were dropped between arrest and disposition, it does not necessarily mean the case was dismissed. In many cases, plea bargains are reached and not all offense charges are filed, but sentencing is determined based upon the original charges and the severity of the offense. 
  • An arrest can be associated with multiple charges and charges can fall into multiple categories (e.g. DUI is counted in the "traffic" and "drug" categories.) 
  • Arrest categories and subcategories are determined based on keywords found in a free text description of the offense. About 7% of offenses have a description that has not yet been categorized. More effort was spent categorizing "Drug" and "Traffic" offenses, so other categories are likely to have a larger percentage of arrests that have not yet been categorized.  

Additional Information

Data were analyzed and prepared by the Management and Performance Hub (MPH).

View the Naloxone Administration Heatmap (full screen)

  • About the Naloxone Administration Heatmap  

This tool provides insight into the incident location where naloxone was administered and reported by EMS providers throughout the state of Indiana. Indiana EMS providers report locations of patient encounters during which naloxone was administered when an opioid overdose was suspected. The drug, also known by the brand name Narcan®, reverses the effects of an opioid overdose and is administered with the intent to save the life of the patient. The Naloxone Administration Heatmap shows naloxone administrations as reported by EMS provider agencies since January 1, 2014.

How to use the map

Use the map to identify local trends specific to a given timeframe. The filters in the top right corner can be used to limit the view to a selected time period or time of day or week. Zoom in or type an address in the search bar to see incident location markers. The legend shows the range of random noise applied to the location in order to protect privacy.

Data source and timeliness

EMS data is sent by providers in the NEMSIS v2 or v3 format to the Indiana Department of Homeland Security (IDHS) database. Depending on the EMS provider, it can take anywhere from 24 hours to 6 weeks for the data to be sent to the database. The EMS data is analyzed by the Indiana Management Performance Hub (MPH).

  • There may be up to a 6 week delay in the reporting of the data due to delays in submissions by EMS providers.
  • Not all patient encounters during which naloxone is administered are overdose events. Preliminary analysis indicates approximately 75% of naloxone incidents are likely actual overdose events.

Incident location

Incident addresses are converted to latitude and longitude using a geocoder. Approximately 15% of naloxone incidents have not been plotted on the map because the address was poorly formatted or missing. In several cases, the address of a hospital emergency department is listed as the incident address. These points are shown on the map but may be data entry errors and not reflective of the true incident location.

Points on the map are never placed at the exact incident location, but are altered randomly to protect privacy. In densely populated areas, the true location is within 100 meters of the point on the map. In moderately populated areas it’s within 300 meters, and in rural areas it’s within 500 meters. Where several incidents have occurred at the same location, each incident is moved slightly so the locations do not appear on top of each other. In order to display incidents that are reported as occurring at the exact same location, a slight amount of random noise (i.e., jitter) was applied to the coordinates of the incidents.

Naloxone information

Naloxone is a drug that reverses the effects of opioids and can be administered when a person shows symptoms of an overdose, such as respiratory depression. When administered, a person typically shows a response to the naloxone within minutes, but may require additional doses depending on the severity of the opioid overdose. The heatmap displays such situations where multiple doses are administered as one incident. Naloxone is NOT a substitute for medical attention. More information can be found at the Indiana State Department of Health website.

Naloxone is often administered when the patient is unresponsive, not breathing, and drug use is suspected. Analysis by MPH and IDHS suggests that approximately 75% of individuals given naloxone were experiencing an opioid overdose, while 25% were most likely not experiencing an overdose.

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