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VAWA-STOP

STOP Violence Against Women Formula Grant Program

Grant Status Closed

The Services * Training * Officers * Prosecutors (STOP) Violence Against Women Formula Grant Program supports communities in their efforts to develop and strengthen effective responses to sexual assault, sex trafficking, domestic violence, dating violence and stalking. The program encourages community partnerships between law enforcement, prosecution, courts, and victim services organizations to enhance victim safety and hold offenders accountable. STOP is authorized by the Violence Against Women Act (VAWA) through the Office on Violence Against Women under the U.S. Department of Justice.

Eligible Entities

The following entities are eligible for the STOP formula grant program:

  • State agencies
  • Units of local government
  • Nonprofit organizations
  • Faith-based organizations

If selected, STOP grantees must protect the privacy and confidentiality of those being provided services and must adhere to all of the requirements outlined in the request for proposal.

All grants from ICJI Victim Services are reimbursement grants.

Required Allocations

Indiana, as all states, must allocate STOP Violence Against Women funding within the parameters of the act as follows:

  • 5% to court programs
  • 25% for law enforcement
  • 25% for prosecution
  • 30% for victim services (of which 10% must go to culturally specific community-based organizations)
  • 15% to further support law enforcement, prosecution, court, or victim services programs, at the state's discretion.
  • 20% amongst two categories above must be allocated for programs or projects that meaningfully address sexual assault, including stranger rape, acquaintance rape, alcohol or drug-facilitated rape, and rape within the context of an intimate partner relationship.

The award period for the current grant cycle is from October 1, 2022 – September 30, 2023.

Pursuant to 34 U.S.C. § 10441(b), funds under this program must be used for one or more of the following purposes:

  • Training law enforcement officers, judges, other court personnel, and prosecutors to more effectively identify and respond to violent crimes against women, including the crimes of sexual assault, domestic violence, dating violence, and stalking, including the appropriate use of nonimmigrant status under subparagraphs (T) and (U) of section 101(a)(15) of the Immigration and Nationality Act (8 U.S.C. § 1101(a)).

  • Developing, training, or expanding units of law enforcement officers, judges, other court personnel, and prosecutors specifically targeting violent crimes against women, including the crimes of sexual assault, domestic violence, dating violence, and stalking.

  • Developing and implementing more effective police, court, and prosecution policies, protocols, orders, and services specifically devoted to preventing, identifying, and responding to violent crimes against women, including the crimes of sexual assault, domestic violence, dating violence, and stalking, as well as the appropriate treatment of victims, including implementation of the grant conditions in section 40002(b)of the Violence Against Women Act of 1994 (34 U.S.C. 12291(b)).

  • Developing, installing, or expanding data collection and communication systems, including computerized systems, linking police, prosecutors, and courts or for the purpose of identifying, classifying, and tracking arrests, protection orders, violations of protection orders, prosecutions, and convictions for violent crimes against women, including the crimes of sexual assault, domestic violence, dating violence, and stalking.

  • Developing, enlarging, or strengthening victim services and legal assistance programs, including sexual assault, domestic violence, dating violence, and stalking programs, developing or improving delivery of victim services and legal services to underserved populations, providing specialized domestic violence court advocates in courts where a significant number of protection orders are granted, and increasing reporting and reducing attrition rates for cases involving violent crimes against women, including crimes of sexual assault, domestic violence, dating violence, and stalking.

  • Developing, enlarging, or strengthening programs addressing the needs and circumstances of Indian tribes in dealing with violent crimes against women, including the crimes of sexual assault, domestic violence, dating violence, and stalking.

  • Supporting formal and informal statewide, multidisciplinary efforts, to the extent not supported by state funds, to coordinate the response of state law enforcement agencies, prosecutors, courts, victim services agencies, and other state agencies and departments, to violent crimes against women, including the crimes of sexual assault, domestic violence, dating violence, and stalking.

  • Training of sexual assault forensic medical personnel examiners in the collection and preservation of evidence, analysis, prevention, and providing expert testimony and treatment of trauma related to sexual assault.

  • Developing, enlarging, or strengthening programs to assist law enforcement, prosecutors, courts, and others to address the needs and circumstances of individuals 50 years of age or over, individuals with disabilities, and Deaf individuals who are victims of sexual assault, domestic violence, dating violence, or stalking, including recognizing, investigating, and prosecuting instances of such violence or assault and targeting outreach and support, counseling, legal assistance, and other victim services to such individuals.

  • Providing assistance to victims of domestic violence and sexual assault in immigration matters.

  • Maintaining core victim services and criminal justice initiatives, while supporting complementary new initiatives and emergency services for victims and their families including rehabilitative work with offenders.

  • Supporting the placement of special victim assistants (to be known as “Jessica Gonzales Victim Assistants”) in local law enforcement agencies to serve as liaisons between victims of sexual assault, domestic violence, dating violence, and stalking and personnel in local law enforcement agencies in order to improve the enforcement of protection orders. Jessica Gonzales Victim Assistants shall have expertise in sexual assault, domestic violence, dating violence, or stalking and may undertake the following activities:
    • developing, in collaboration with prosecutors, courts, and victim service providers, standardized response policies for local law enforcement agencies, including the use of evidence-based indicators to assess the risk of domestic and dating violence homicide and prioritize dangerous or potentially lethal cases;
    • notifying persons seeking enforcement of protection orders as to what responses will be provided by the relevant law enforcement agency;
    • referring persons seeking enforcement of protection orders to supplementary services (such as emergency shelter programs, hotlines, or legal assistance services); and
    • taking other appropriate action to assist or secure the safety of the person seeking enforcement of a protection order.

  • Providing funding to law enforcement agencies, victim services providers, and state, tribal, territorial, and local governments (which funding stream shall be known as the Crystal Judson Domestic Violence Protocol Program) to promote:
    • the development and implementation of training for local victim domestic violence service providers, and to fund victim services personnel, to be known as “Crystal Judson Victim Advocates,” to provide supportive services and advocacy for victims of domestic violence committed by law enforcement personnel;
    • the implementation of protocols within law enforcement agencies to ensure consistent and effective responses to the commission of domestic violence by personnel within such agencies such as the model policy promulgated by the International Association of Chiefs of Police (“Domestic Violence by Police Officers: A Policy of the IACP, Police Response to Violence Against Women Project” July 2003)); and
    • the development of such protocols in collaboration with state, tribal, territorial, local victim services providers, and domestic violence coalitions.
    • Any law enforcement, state, tribal, territorial, or local government agency receiving funding under the Crystal Judson Domestic Violence Protocol Program, and any subgrantee of such an agency, shall (1) on an annual basis receive additional training on the topic of incidents of domestic violence committed by law enforcement personnel from domestic violence and sexual assault nonprofit organizations and (2) after a period of 2 years provide report of the adopted protocol to the Department of Justice, including a summary of progress in implementing such protocol.

  • Developing and promoting state, local, or tribal legislation and policies that enhance best practices for responding to sexual assault, domestic violence, dating violence, and stalking.

  • Developing, implementing, or enhancing Sexual Assault Response Teams, or other similar coordinated community responses to sexual assault.

  • Developing and strengthening policies, protocols, best practices, and training for law enforcement agencies and prosecutors relating to the investigation and prosecution of sexual assault cases and the appropriate treatment of victims.

  • Developing, enlarging, or strengthening programs addressing sexual assault against men, women, and youth in correctional and detention settings.
  • Identifying and conducting inventories of backlogs of sexual assault evidence collection kits and developing protocols and policies for responding to and addressing such backlogs, including protocols and policies for notifying and involving victims.

  • Developing, enlarging, or strengthening programs and projects to provide services and responses targeting male and female victims of sexual assault, domestic violence, dating violence, or stalking, whose ability to access traditional services and responses is affected by their sexual orientation or gender identity, as defined in section 249(c) of title 18 of the United States Code.

  • Developing, enhancing, or strengthening prevention and educational programming to address sexual assault, domestic violence, dating violence, or stalking, or female genital mutilation or cutting; with not more than 5 percent of the amount allocated to a state to be used for this purpose.

  • Developing, enhancing, or strengthening programs and projects to improve evidence collection methods for victims of domestic violence, dating violence, sexual assault, or stalking, including through funding for technology that better detects bruising and injuries across skin tones and related training.

  • Developing, enlarging, or strengthening culturally specific victim services programs to provide culturally specific victim services and responses to female genital mutilation or cutting.

  • Providing victim advocates in State or local law enforcement agencies, prosecutors’ offices, and courts and providing supportive services and advocacy to Indian victims of domestic violence, dating violence, sexual assault, and stalking.

  • Paying any fees charged by any governmental authority for furnishing a victim or the child of a victim with any of the following documents:
    • A birth certificate or passport of the individual, as required by law.
    • An identification card issued to the person by a State or Tribe, that shows that the person is a resident of the State or member of the Tribe.

The Office on Violence Against Women (OVW) is interested in supporting the priority areas identified below. In shaping their strategies, OVW encourages states and territories to develop and support projects that:

  • Advance racial equity as an essential component of ending sexual assault, domestic violence, dating violence, and stalking.

  • Increase access to justice for all survivors of sexual assault, domestic violence, dating violence, and stalking, including through exploration of survivor-centered criminal justice system reform.

  • Strengthen efforts to prevent and end sexual assault, including victim services and civil and criminal justice responses.

  • Expand economic justice and financial advocacy for survivors of sexual assault, domestic violence, dating violence, and stalking, including as a tool for violence prevention.

  • Improve outreach, services, civil and criminal justice responses, prevention, and support for survivors of sexual assault, domestic violence, dating violence, and stalking from underserved communities, particularly LGBTQ+ and immigrant communities.

The budget items listed below are ineligible and will not be supported by this program’s funding:

  • Direct financial assistance to a client such as cash, gift cards, or checks.

  • Alcohol, food (except emergency food for victims) and entertainment costs.

  • Lobbying.

  • Fundraising (including financial campaigns, endowment drives, solicitation of gifts and bequests, and similar expenses incurred solely to raise capital or obtain contributions) and time spent procuring funding including completing federal and state funding applications.

  • Purchase of real estate.

  • Construction.

  • Physical modification to buildings, including minor renovations (such as painting or carpeting).

  • Purchase of vehicles.

  • Immigration fees.

  • Costs may not be included or used to meet match requirements of any other federal grant.

  • Overtime is allowed, but to claim the overtime rate, there must be a separate line item in the budget that includes the overtime rate of pay.

There is a 25% match requirement imposed on grant funds under this program for government entities. If the applicant agency is a nonprofit, nongovernmental organization that is recognized by the IRS under section 501(c)3 of Title 26, the match requirement is waived. If the non-profit is providing services in the law enforcement or prosecutor category (e.g., training law enforcement officers), match is required must be provided by the state. The non-profit can voluntarily provide match to meet this requirement on behalf of the state.

Reporting

Subgrantees are required to complete an Annual Progress Report (also referred to as the Muskie Report) that reflects the previous 12 months of activity, as well as a quarterly financial and programmatic report. Download the STOP Subgrantee Annual Progress Reporting form. Be sure to SAVE A COPY before entering data.

Annual Progress Report

Reporting Form Instructions

View reporting form instructions for more in-depth guidance on how to report about STOP-funded activities on the Annual Progress Report.

Learn more

Formula FTE Calculator

This FTE calculator is an optional tool that can be used by STOP Formula subgrantees to calculate totals for the staff section of their progress report.

Learn more

  • 2021 Awards

    Number of Awards: 53
    Total Amount Awarded: $3,068,243

    Organization

    County/Statewide

    Award Amount

    Allen County Prosecuting Attorney's Office

    Allen

    $61,292

    Fort Wayne Police Department

    Allen

    $136,407

    YWCA Northeast Indiana

    Allen

    $49,704

    Bartholomew County Prosecutor's Office

    Bartholomew

    $58,920

    Boone County Prosecutor's Office

    Boone

    $30,872

    Brown County Prosecutor's Office

    Brown

    $30,000

    Cass County Prosecutor's Office

    Cass

    $13,693

    Clark County Sheriff's Office

    Clark

    $41,219

    Clark County Prosecutor's Office

    Clark

    $24,338

    Clinton County Prosecutor's Office

    Clinton

    $17,010

    Muncie Police Department

    Delaware

    $29,502

    A Better Way Services, Inc.

    Delaware

    $15,385

    Delaware County Prosecuting Attorney

    Delaware

    $153,001

    Elkhart County Prosecutor's Office

    Elkhart

    $29,122

    Fayette County Prosecutor’s Office

    Fayette

    $16,999

    Grant County Prosecutor's Office

    Grant

    $36,032

    Hancock County Prosecutor's Office

    Hancock

    $66,498

    Hendricks County Prosecutor's Office

    Hendricks

    $54,750

    Howard County Prosecutor's Office

    Howard

    $47,501

    Johnson County Prosecutor’s Office

    Johnson

    $47,052

    Hobart Police Department

    Lake

    $76,872

    Fair Haven, Inc.

    Lake

    $69,520

    Lake County Prosecutor

    Lake

    $98,852

    Stepping Stone Shelter for Women, Inc.

    LaPorte

    $11,797

    Lawrence County Probation

    Lawrence

    $5,000

    Lawrence County Prosecutor's Office

    Lawrence

    $55,898

    Madison County Prosecutor's Office

    Madison

    $72,293

    Marion County Prosecutor's Office

    Marion

    $68,041

    Marion County Sheriff's Department

    Marion

    $45,053

    Monroe County Prosecutor's Office

    Monroe

    $100,643

    Morgan County Prosecutor's Office

    Morgan

    $20,000

    Noble County Prosecutor's Office

    Noble

    $26,197

    Owen County Prosecutor's Office

    Owen

    $15,000

    Porter County Prosecutor's Office

    Porter

    $50,545

    Putnam County Prosecutor's Office

    Putnam

    $20,028

    Ripley County Prosecutor's Office

    Ripley

    $85,019

    Rush County Prosecutor's Office

    Rush

    $53,571

    Scott County Sheriff's Department

    Scott

    $74,783

    Scott County Prosecutor's Office

    Scott

    $41,711

    Shelby County Prosecutor’s Office

    Shelby

    $101,993

    St. Joseph County Prosecutor's Office

    St. Joseph

    $185,174

    Steuben County Prosecuting Attorney

    Steuben

    $26,250

    YWCA Greater Lafayette

    Tippecanoe

    $28,758

    Vanderburgh County Prosecutor's Office

    Vanderburgh

    $68,563

    Vanderburgh County Sheriff’s Office

    Vanderburgh

    $70,547

    Albion Fellows Bacon Center, Inc.

    Vanderburgh

    $34,001

    Vermillion County Prosecutor's Office

    Vermillion

    $70,807

    Genesis of Richmond, Inc.

    Wayne

    $88,833

    Indiana Coalition Against Domestic Violence

    Statewide

    $85,196

    Indiana Coalition to End Sexual Assault

    Statewide

    $124,725

    Latino Coalition Against Domestic & Sexual Violence, Inc.

    Statewide

    $62,471

    Supreme Court

    Statewide

    $112,500

    Neighborhood Christian Legal Clinic

    Statewide

    $58,305

  • Past RFPs

Webinar

In this webinar, ICJI’s Victim Services Division discusses the FY22 S.T.O.P. Violence Against Women Grant grant/RFP, important features of the program and how to apply in IntelliGrants. Follow along using the presentation below.

Download the PowerPoint

TRAINING HUB: For additional webinars on topics ranging from grant writing tips to filling out the Subgrantee Basic Budget form, click here.

STOP Formula Training Video


Review all of the sections of the reporting form with examples and detailed instructions on how best to report your STOP-funded activities.
Watch here

Video: What is full-time equivalent (FTE)?


Stumped by FTEs? Spend 4 minutes (actually, less!) watching this video.
Watch here

Crafting Narratives Training Video


Data are just summaries of thousands of stories – tell a few of those stories to help make the data meaningful. Watch this video to learn more.
Watch here

Crafting Narratives - Training Materials


Access and download all of the materials you need to follow along with the webinar training!
Click here

Technical Assistance

For technical assistance with submitting an application, contact the ICJI Helpdesk, which is open Monday through Friday from 8:00 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. ET, except state holidays. ICJI is not responsible for technical issues with grant submission within 48 hours of grant deadline.

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