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Indiana State Library

Library > Collections > Genealogy > About the Genealogy Collection > Genealogy FAQ Genealogy FAQ

Adoption

Where can I find adoption records?

The Indiana State Library does not have adoption records.  Adoption records after 1941 are confidential by Indiana law.

The genealogical collection at the Indiana State Library is best suited for pre-1930 research. We have very few materials that would be helpful for those performing adoption research other than general reference books on conducting adoption research and Indiana telephone directories. Until very recent times, unmarried women did not have birth announcements in newspapers.

Pre-1941 adoption records are available from the local Circuit Court Clerk's office. As a result of a cooperative microfilming program between the State and the Genealogical Society of Utah, Indiana trial court Civil Order Books through 1920 are in the process of being microfilmed, with a positive print deposited with the Indiana State Library. These ledgers may contain brief notations of adoptions. One may find these by consulting separate or in-volume indexes, under the name of the adopting parties, or under "A" for "adoption of" or "I" for "In Reference to]." Virtually no demographic or family lineage data will be found. Entries usually reflect the approval of the petition of the adopting parties, giving their names and that of the adoptee.

You may wish to contact the Indiana State Department of Health for possible information on the medical history registry for adoptees. An excellent overview of adoption records in Indiana is John J. Newman and Thomas Q. Jones, "Adoption of Heirs, 1855-1941", The Hoosier Genealogist, vol. 32, no. 1, pp. 24-27. (call number 977.2 H789)

There are several internet sites on adoption that may be helpful as well. A good place to begin is Cyndi'sList.

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Beginning your Genealogy Research

How do I begin my genealogy research?

Have you interviewed your relatives? Talk to your parents, grandparents, aunts and uncles. You may want to start by filling out a Lineage Chart (these are available at the Indiana State Library as well as many other genealogy libraries around the country and the Internet) and write down the dates of important life events: birth, death and marriages. Where did your family live?  Most records of genealogical value are kept at the county level, so you will need to know in which county the family lived near the time of events such as births, deaths, and marriages, before you can search for records relating to the family. Census records are one of the most valuable tools available to family history researchers and more than 90 percent survive.

Federal Census records provide one of the few state-wide indexes available. The census will tell you in which county the family resided at the time of the census, and the censuses of 1850 and later will provide additional information on each individual, such as name, age, and birthplace (state or county).  More recent censuses ask more questions than the earlier ones, so it is usually best to search all the censuses available, starting with the 1930 Federal Census, which is the most recent census available for public use, and working backwards in time. If you are intending to start your research at the Indiana State Library, we have a compiled a brochure, Beginning Your Genealogical Research, that we can mail to you upon request.

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Cemetery Records

Where can I find cemetery records?

While the Indiana State Library cannot claim to have information on all Indiana cemeteries, we have compiled a Cemetery Locator Database , searchable by county, which will give the names of every cemetery for which we have either tombstone inscriptions or location. The database does not have the names of people buried in the cemeteries, but most citations will give the township in which the cemetery is located.  The call numbers in the right-hand columns refer to the items in our collection in which the cemeteries are mentioned.  Some of the call numbers will be followed by "location only" or "LOC ONLY."  This means that the item gives only the location of the cemetery;  tombstone inscriptions are not included.  We can check an indexed cemetery compilation for the name of an individual.  However, many of the compilations are not indexed--they are arranged in the order the compiler walked down the rows.  In cases such as these, if the compilation is only a few pages, we can search those pages for a name.  If the compilation is a long one, it really isn't possible for us to check dozens of pages.  We are also unable to check all cemeteries in a county if there isn't a county-wide index.  Because almost all the compilations are inscriptions from tombstones, if the person never had a tombstone, or the tombstone was missing or unreadable when the compilation was made, the person's name may not appear in the listing for that cemetery.

In 1939, a joint Works Progress Administration/American Legion project was initiated to identify the burial places of all veterans in Indiana.  The project was conducted in 51 of Indiana's 92 counties. The Indiana State Library has the microfilmed Indiana Veterans' Graves Registration (by county) for Adams, Blackford, Brown, Cass, Clark, Clay, Crawford, Daviess, DeKalb, Delaware, Elkhart, Floyd, Gibson, Grant, Greene, Harrison, Howard, Huntington, Jasper, Jay, Johnson, Knox, Kosciusko, LaGrange, Lake, LaPorte, Lawrence, Madison, Marion, Marshall, Martin, St. Joseph, Spencer, Starke, Steuben, Sullivan, Tipton, Vanderburgh, Vermillion, Vigo, Warren, and Washington counties. Within each county, the index is arranged alphabetically by the veteran's surname. We can check the index if you can provide the veteran's surname and a probable county of burial.  The Indiana State Archives has the original card file of the veterans identified in those 51 counties.

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Census Records

What state census records are available at the Indiana State Library?

State censuses giving family information have never been taken for all of the State of Indiana.  According to John Newman, former State Archivist, Indiana only had a "census" in respect to the general definition of the word, i.e., a numbering of the people for taxation, congressional districts, etc.

Article 3, Section 2 of the 1816 Constitution required an enumeration of all white male inhabitants above the age of 21, the first to begin in 1820 and thereafter every 5 years.  This was for apportionment purposes.  The various census laws later passed required these to be deposited with the county auditor.  These were alphabetical lists of males over the age of 21 by township.  Ages were given after 1865.

Indiana State Censuses were taken in 1820. 1825, 1830, 1835, 1840, 1845, 1850, 1853, 1866, 1871, 1877, 1873, 1889, 1895, 1901, 1913, and 1919.  Only fragments of these censuses survive.  There is no state-wide index to any of these censuses.  The Genealogy Collection has photocopies or transcripts of some counties for some years.  Some of these are for single townships only.  The Indiana State Archives has copies for a few counties for individual years.  County auditors may have some additional years for their own counties.  If you are interested in a particular person in a specific county, we can check our transcripts or copies for that person's name.

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What federal census records are available at the Indiana State Library?

The Indiana State Library has all federal censuses of Indiana from 1820 through 1940; censuses and  Soundex indexes for all other states from the earliest census through 1880, and for 1930; and many censuses and indexes for surrounding states for 1900, 1910, and 1920. Please view our online census chart to learn what is available on microfilm at the Indiana State Library. We also have two online subscription databases, Ancestry Library and HeritageQuest , that have federal census records for the entire country for all available years. These databases are available at no cost within the library, or we can check a few indexes for you with specific information (timeframe, name of person, county). 

Please note that the 1940 census is the latest available for research.

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Where can I find information about post 1940 federal census records?

The U.S. Census Bureau does not release information collected in the Decennial Census of Population and Housing on individuals for 72 years. The 1940 census is the latest year made available to the public. The U.S. Census Bureau provides an Age Search Service to the public. They will search the 1910-2000 population census which produces a transcript that may contain: age, sex, race, state, or county of birth, and relationship to the head of the household. This service is provided for the following reasons: evidence to qualify for social security and other retirement benefits, making passport applications, prove relationship in settling estates, in genealogy research, etc., or to satisfy other situations where a birth or other certificate may be needed but is not available. This information can only be released to the named person, his/her heirs, or legal representatives.

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Family Histories

Do you have a book about my family at your library?

The Indiana State Library has an extensive collection of family histories both in print and on microfilm or microfiche. Our pamphlet collection includes many family histories donated by researchers. To make best use of this collection, we encourage you to visit our library. However, we may be able to check a source for you with very specific information. Please note that your local LDS Family History Center may have your family history available on microfilm for rental. If you would like to donate your family history research or other materials, please contact us. Donations to the Indiana State Library Genealogy Collection are deeply appreciated and are tax deductible. You may also wish to search our online catalog  for the availability of a book on your family history. Search by keyword, i.e. "Brown family" to identify sources in our collection.

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Inter-Library Loan

Can I borrowing books from the Genealogy Collection through inter-library loan?

All of our print materials are for reference use only and do not circulate. However, you can make photocopies of pages of select materials in the library. We can also make copies of pages of select material for 25 cents per page, plus postage. These requests should be made via an e-mail or letter, you will need to include the call number, and page numbers in your request. For copies of complete items, you may wish to contact the Allen County Public Library in Fort Wayne, Indiana which offers a photo-duplication service. Copyright restrictions may apply. 

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Can I borrowing microfilm from the Genealogy Collection through inter-library loan?

The Genealogy Collection does NOT loan microfilm in its collection. However, you may borrow microfilm through your local LDS Family History Center or through the National Archives Microfilm Rental Program.

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Locating living friends or relatives

I am looking for  a living friend or relative. Can you help me find him?

We cannot locate missing living persons for you. Records of living persons (birth, death, military) are not easily accessible because of privacy laws.

Family history materials at the Indiana State Library are best suited for research before the 1930's. We have very few materials that would be helpful to those trying to locate living people other than how-to books; How to Locate Anyone Who Is or Has Been in the Military, Armed Forces Locator Guide (call number 929 J68h 1999), Find Anyone Fast (call number 929 J68f). We also have telephone directories and marriage indexes that may be helpful in your search. Our staff is unable to undertake this type of extensive research. We recommend you check this site from Cyndi's List for possible information.

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Military

I am looking for information on my Civil War ancestors. Can you help?

The Indiana State Library Genealogy Colection has a copy of the Roster of Union Soldiers (call number 973.7 Allre), Roster of Confederate Soldiers (call number 973.7 Allreu), Civil War Roll of Honor (call number 973.7 Alla), soldiers killed in action, Report of Adjutant General Indiana War of the Rebellion 1861-1865 (call number 973.7 I39ad), gives the date a soldier mustered in and out. The Indiana State Archives has state records of Indiana soldiers who served in the Civil War, including the muster rolls. The Indiana State Library has the T-288 microfilm series Index to the General Pension Files 1861-1936, in its collection. This source is also available online via Ancestry Library, a subscription database available for free at the Indiana State Library.  If you are unable to visit our library, you could borrow the microfilm from the National Archives. Many genealogy libraries around the country have this microfilm series as part of their collection.

You may wish to contact the Indiana Collection of the Indiana State Library for information on Indiana regimental histories. The Manuscript Section has a collection of Civil War era letters, diaries and photographs from Hoosiers. The Library also holds the microfiche set Regimental Histories of the American Civil War, which contains Civil War regimental histories from across the United States.

The National Archives in Washington D.C. has the largest collection of civil war records , including the compiled military service records of  Union soldiers. 

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I am looking for information on my Revolutionary War ancestor. Can you help?

The Genealogy Collection has several print indexes in its collection that may be useful, including the Genealogical Abstracts of Revolutionary War Pension Files (call number 973 A11whg), an every name index including soldier's, wives/widows, Index to Revolutionary War Service Records (call number 973.34 A11whi), gives the date a soldier mustered in and out, Index of the Rolls of Honor  in the Lineage Books of the N.S.D.A.R (call number 973.346 D2aL v.1-4), Ancestor's Index DAR Patriot Index (call number 973.346 D2adp v.1-3) Revolutionary Patriots 1775-1783, Roster of Soldiers and Patriots of American Revolution Buried in Indiana (call number 973.34 I385d v.1-2). On microfilm, we have the Revolutionary War Pension & Bounty Land Warrant Application Files.

Reference librarians at the Indiana State Library are usually unable to check these sources for patrons via e-mail or letter unless the soldier has an Indiana connection. However, these sources are widely available at genealogy libraries around the country. One of the local chapters of the DAR, the Caroline Scott Harrison Chapter has volunteers at the Indiana State Library every Wednesday from 1 to 4 p.m. to assist prospective members.

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Native American (Indian) Ancestry

How can I prove Native American (Indian) ancestry?

Native American ancestry can be very difficult to prove. Our staff is unable to undertake this type of extensive research. However, beginning Native American research is conducted using the same genealogical sources as anyone just starting his search, births, deaths, marriages, census, etc. You will need to work your way backwards to the point where you can identify the specific individual who is the Native American ancestor. When that person has been identified, you will then need to determine that person's tribal affiliation. After the tribe has been identified, an investigation of resources specific to that tribe then can be initiated. The Indiana State Library Genealogy Collection has compiled a Native American bibliography that may be helpful. There are several Internet sites that may be useful on Cyndi'sList

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Naturalization Records

Where can I find Naturalization records?

Naturalization is the process in which an immigrant (alien) living in the United States becomes an American citizen. It is a voluntary act; naturalization is not required. Many Indiana counties have transferred their naturalization records to the Indiana State Archives. They maintain a database which includes Indiana naturalization records prior to 1951. It is important to note that all naturalization records from this time period are not included in this database. Please read this Indiana State Archives webpage for more information on the naturalization process.

Please be aware that many immigrants, especially women, did not complete this process. The declaration of intent will have the most information of genealogical value. The Indiana State Library has some information on naturalization, including a few indexes and some records on microfilm that may be useful. We can check the only statewide index of naturalization information available, An Index to Indiana Naturalization Records found in Various Order Books of the Ninety-two local courts prior to 1907 (call number 977.2 I3773 2001).

Beginning in 1870, the question of whether a person was naturalized was included in the federal census. This question was asked if a man was age 21 years or older. If they were naturalized, "NA" will be written in the column. The 1880 census does not include a question about citizenship. However, the 1900, 1910, 1920 and 1930 census does. The 1920 census indicates the year a person was naturalized. Beginning in the 1900 census, the year a person came to this country was listed.

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Obituaries

How do I obtain a copy of an obituary?

The Indiana Collection of the Indiana State Library has the largest collection of Indiana newspapers in the world. Staff have created a listing of newspaper titles for each county that are available from its collection. If you know the date of the obituary, not the date of death, and the newspaper in which it was published, the Newspaper Section will photocopy the obituary for you. Due to staffing constraints, staff cannot search newspapers for obituaries.  However, microfilm copies of Indiana newspapers are available from the Indiana State Library through interlibrary loan. Your local public library can assist you in processing your interlibrary loan request.  You will need to know the county where the obituary was published, the name of the newspaper, and the approximate date of the obituary.

 The Genealogy Collection has some indexes of obituaries in some counties. Dates covered in the indexes can vary. Some indexes include only one or two years while others span ten or more years. If we have an obituary index for the place and time in which you are interested, we can check those indexes for a particular name. Please note that full obituaries were not common in Indiana newspapers until the late 1800's. Prior to that time there may be only a one-line death notice, or no announcement at all.   

For information on the collection and borrowing newspapers on microfilm, contact the Newspaper Section

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Passenger Lists

Where can I find ship passenger lists?

It is important to note that America's most famous port of entry, Ellis Island, did not open until 1892. The Indiana State Library has some passenger lists on microfilm. There is a finding aid to published passenger lists in our collection that may be helpful: 

Filby, P. William, ed. Passenger and Immigration Lists Index: A Guide to Published Arrival Records of ... Passengers who Came to the United States and Canada in the Seventeenth, Eighteenth, and Nineteenth Centuries (3 volumes plus annual supplements) (call number 929.11 P287f)

Due to staffing and time constraints, reference librarians cannot check these sources for you. If you are unable to visit our library, you could borrow the passenger lists on microfilm from the National Archives. The Filby index is available at most genealogy libraries around the country. Be sure to check the census records for clues. Beginning in the 1900 census, the year a person came to this country was indicated.

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Vital Records

Where can I find birth records in Indiana?    

Births were not officially recorded in Indiana until 1882. The Genealogy Collection has birth indexes for most Indiana counties, 1882-1920. We can check these indexes for one or two names. Please note that the recording of births was sporadic until 1907, when stricter laws were enacted. Therefore, many people born in that timeframe did not have an official birth record. You may need to use other sources, such as census or church records, to verify a birth date, or place of birth. For example, the 1900 census calls for the month and the year a person was born.  Because children are often unnamed in the index, we must have identifying information such as parents' names, approximate date of birth, and city or county. 

Copies of Indiana birth records may be obtained from the local health departments in the county where the birth occurred. The Indiana State Department of Health began keeping copies of birth records in October 1907. After that date, birth records can be requested from either the local health departments, or the Indiana Department of Health.

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Where can I find death records in Indiana?

Deaths were not officially recorded in Indiana until 1882. The Genealogy Collection has death indexes for most Indiana counties, 1882-1920. We can check these indexes for one or two names. You may need to use other sources, such as cemetery or will records to verify a death. The Genealogy Collection has will/probate, and obituary indexes for many Indiana counties. We also maintain a Cemetery Locator Database that lists the call numbers of books and pamphlets in our collection that contain tombstone inscriptions. We can check a few cemetery compilations for one or two names. This may give you the date of death, or at least the year and the month. The database does not include the names of the people buried in each cemetery.

The Indiana State Library has very few recent death indexes. However, you could check the Social Security Death Index for deaths that occurred after the early 1960's. Copies of death records may be obtained from the local health departments. The Indiana State Department of Health began keeping death records in 1900. After that date, death records can be requested from either the local health departments or the Indiana State Department of Health

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Where can I obtain a copy of an early marriage record in Indiana?

The Indiana State Library has early marriage indexes for almost all (a few counties records were lost due to fires or floods) Indiana counties. In addition, we have microfilm copies of the actual marriage records for most Indiana counties. If we do not have a microfilm copy of a county's marriage record, we can supply the address of the appropriate county clerk's office.

The availability of the indexes and microfilmed records depends on the county and the timeframe. The Indiana State Library's Indiana Marriages through 1850 database is a compilation of the printed indexes for most Indiana counties. Marriages were recorded from the formation of the county; indexes for some counties go back to pre-statehood (1816). If you find an entry in this database, we can check our holding to see if we have the marriage record on microfilm. If we have the marriage record we can make a copy for you. We can also check some marriage indexes later than 1850 for you if you send an e-mail or letter request. Please include the names of the bride and groom, approximate date of the marriage and the county in which the marriage took place, if known. 

Prior to around 1905, the marriage record proper did not routinely name the parents of the bride or groom. Starting in 1882, some Indiana counties kept a separate record book, called the marriage returns, which often did name the parents of the bride and groom. Some counties did keep a separate record of marriage applications, but this usually started in the early years of the 20th century.

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Where can I obtain a copy of a recent marriage record in Indiana?

Marriages are public records in Indiana. Current marriage records are available from the local county clerk's offices.

The Indiana State Department of Health began compiling a statewide marriage index in 1958. This was compiled as an information source only; the state does not keep copies of marriage records. The index indicates the county where the couple took out their marriage license. The Indiana State Library has a copy of the statewide marriage index on microfilm from 1962-1997. We also have the index in print form available in our Reading Room, 1958-1965. If you send us an e-mail or letter request, we can check the Indiana Statewide Marriage Index for a few years for specific names.

For a marriage that took place after 1997, contact the local county clerk's offices, in the county where the marriage license was issued. If you don't know the county where the marriage license was issued you can contact the Indiana State Department of Health directly.

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Where can I find Divorce records in Indiana?

Divorces in Indiana were granted by the Indiana General Assembly prior to 1852.  An index to the names of those couples can be found in “Divorces granted by the Indiana General Assembly prior to 1852” ISLG 977.2 N548D c1981.
After the adoption of the new state constitution in 1851, the authority to grant divorces was shifted to individual county jurisdiction in the court of common pleas.  There is no state-wide index available for divorce records after 1852.  You will need to contact the county clerk or recorder in the county where the divorce was filed http://www.in.gov/library/3263.htm

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My ancestor was born in the early 1800's. How can I find his parents' names?

Births were not recorded in Indiana until 1882. Members of the household were not listed in census records until 1850. Parents' names were not listed on marriage records until the late 1800's to the early 1900's; depending on the county. If the person died after 1882, the death record or obituary may reveal the parents' names. Sometimes there are biographical sketches in county histories that may indicate the parents' names. The Indiana county history collection is housed in the Indiana Collection of the Indiana State Library. Contact them directly for a check of the county history indexes.

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GEN DB 10-17-2014