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Indiana Historical Bureau

Christmas (Noel) Dagenet - Footnote 5 Christmas (Noel) Dagenet - Footnote 5

Christmas (Noel) Dagenet (1) Historical Marker
(61.2004.1)

Footnote 5

Married to Mary Ann Isaacs 1819 by Isaac McCoy at his Baptist Indian mission near here.

Father Flavian Strange, History of the Catholic Church in Parke County (February 11, 1957), [p. 4]

Father Flavian Strange, History of the Catholic Church in Parke County (February 11, 1957), [p. 4]

Mary Ann Isaacs was a member of the Brotherton tribe of New York. Mary Anne Dagenett, "Census and Testimony Relative to New York Indians in Kansas," 1859, typescript copy from National Archives Records Group 75, Special case 29.

Mary Ann Isaacs was a member of the Brotherton tribe of New York. Mary Anne Dagenett, "Census and Testimony Relative to New York Indians in Kansas," 1859, typescript copy from National Archives Records Group 75, Special case 29.

Isaac McCoy, History of Baptist Indian Missions (1840, reprint New York, 1970), 64, indicates he married them February 16. Beckwith (134 note) also states that Dagenet married Mary Ann Isaacs on February 16, 1819 in Parke County; he used McCoy as a source in his work.

Isaac McCoy, History of Baptist Indian Missions (1840, reprint New York, 1970), 64, indicates he married them February 16. Beckwith (134 note) also states that Dagenet married Mary Ann Isaacs on February 16, 1819 in Parke County; he used McCoy as a source in his work.

Isaac McCoy was a Baptist minister who began his ministry near Vincennes in 1810. His first mission to the Indians was on Raccoon Creek in Parke County circa 1818. He moved to Fort Wayne in 1820 and to the Carey Mission (near Niles, Michigan) in 1822. McCoy was one of the first to promote the removal of eastern Indian tribes to the unoccupied areas of the west to a permanent Indian country (circa 1824). After the Indian Removal Act of 1830 was passed, McCoy moved his missions to Indian Country. In 1842, McCoy moved to Louisville, Kentucky to direct the American Indian Mission Association, which he organized. He died in Louisville in 1846. "Isaac McCoy Papers-Finding Aid-Kansas State Historical Society," (accessed November 20, 2003), <http://www.kshs.org/research/collections/documents/personalpapers/findingaids/McCoy.htm>.

Isaac McCoy was a Baptist minister who began his ministry near Vincennes in 1810. His first mission to the Indians was on Raccoon Creek in Parke County circa 1818. He moved to Fort Wayne in 1820 and to the Carey Mission (near Niles, Michigan) in 1822. McCoy was one of the first to promote the removal of eastern Indian tribes to the unoccupied areas of the west to a permanent Indian country (circa 1824). After the Indian Removal Act of 1830 was passed, McCoy moved his missions to Indian Country. In 1842, McCoy moved to Louisville, Kentucky to direct the American Indian Mission Association, which he organized. He died in Louisville in 1846. "Isaac McCoy Papers-Finding Aid-Kansas State Historical Society," (accessed November 20, 2003).