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Immunizations

Disease

Vaccine

Disease spread by

Disease symptoms

Chickenpox

Varicella vaccine protects against chickenpox.

Air, direct contact

Rash, tiredness, headache, fever

Diphtheria

DTaP* vaccine protects against diphtheria.

Air, direct contact

Sore throat, mild fever, weakness, swollen glands in neck

Hib

Hib vaccine protects against Haemophilus influenzae type b.

Air, direct contact

May be no symptoms unless bacteria enter the blood

Hepatitis A

HepA vaccine protects against hepatitis A.

Direct contact, contaminated food or water

May be no symptoms, fever, stomach pain, loss of appetite, fatigue, vomiting, jaundice (yellowing of skin and eyes), dark urine

Hepatitis B

HepB vaccine protects against hepatitis B.

Contact with blood or body fluids

May be no symptoms, fever, headache, weakness, vomiting, jaundice (yellowing of skin and eyes), joint pain

Influenza (Flu)

Flu vaccine protects against influenza.

Air, direct contact

Fever, muscle pain, sore throat, cough, extreme fatigue

Measles

MMR** vaccine protects against measles.

Air, direct contact

Rash, fever, cough, runny nose, pink eye

Mumps

MMR**vaccine protects against mumps.

Air, direct contact

Swollen salivary glands (under the jaw), fever, headache, tiredness, muscle pain

Pertussis

DTaP* vaccine protects against pertussis (whooping cough).

Air, direct contact

Severe cough, runny nose, apnea (a pause in breathing in infants)

Polio

IPV vaccine protects against polio.

Air, direct contact, through the mouth

May be no symptoms, sore throat, fever, nausea, headache

Pneumococcal

PCV13 or Pneumovax 23 vaccines protect against pneumococcus.

Air, direct contact

May be no symptoms, pneumonia (infection in the lungs)

Rotavirus

RV vaccine protects against rotavirus.

Through the mouth

Diarrhea, fever, vomiting

Rubella

MMR** vaccine protects against rubella.

Air, direct contact

Sometimes rash, fever, swollen lymph nodes

Tetanus

DTaP* vaccine protects against tetanus (0 – 6 yrs).

Tdap (7 yrs – up).

Exposure through cuts in skin

Stiffness in neck and abdominal muscles, difficulty swallowing, muscle spasms, fever

Yellow Fever

YF-VAX vaccine protects against yellow fever.

bites by infected mosquitoes

fever, muscle pain with prominent backache, headache, loss of appetite, and nausea or vomiting

Shingles

Shingrix vaccine protects against shingles.

reactivation of varicella-zoster virus (chickenpox)

painful rash that blisters, acute pain described as aching, burning, stabbing, or shock-like

* DTaP combines protection against diphtheria, tetanus, and pertussis.
** MMR combines protection against measles, mumps, and rubella.

Birth

Before leaving the hospital or birthing center, your baby receives the first of 3 doses of the vaccine that protects against Hepatitis B. Hepatitis B virus can cause chronic swelling of the liver and possible lifelong complications. It’s important to protect infants and young children from hepatitis B because they are more likely than adults to develop incurable chronic (long term) infection that can result in liver damage and liver cancer.

1 to 2 months

Protect your baby by providing immunity early in life. Starting at 1 to 2 months of age, your baby receives the following vaccines to develop immunity from potentially harmful diseases:

4 months

Protect your baby by providing immunity early in life. Stay on track with the recommended vaccine schedule. At 4 months of age, your baby receives the following vaccines to develop immunity from potentially harmful diseases:

6 months

Protect your baby by providing immunity early in life. Stay on track with the recommended vaccine schedule. At 6 months of age, your baby receives the following vaccines to develop immunity from potentially harmful diseases:

7-11 months

There are usually no vaccinations scheduled between 7 and 11 months of age. However, if your baby has missed an earlier vaccination, now is a good time to “catch up.”

Babies 6 months and older should receive flu vaccination every flu season.

12-23 months

By following the recommended schedule and fully immunizing your child by 2 years of age, your child should be protected against 14 vaccine preventable diseases. Between 12 and 23 months of age, your child receives the following vaccines to continue developing immunity from potentially harmful diseases:

Additionally, children should receive flu vaccination every flu season.

2 to 3 years

Between 2 and 3 years of age, your child should visit the doctor once a year for check-ups.

Additionally, children should receive flu vaccination every flu season.

School Vaccination List K-12

Click here to view the 2021-2022 Immunization Requirements with Hep A all grades.

4 to 6 years - Kindergarten

  • Chickenpox (varicella vaccine)
  • Diphtheria, tetanus, and pertussis (DTaP vaccine)
  • Measles, mumps and rubella (MMR vaccine)
  • Polio (IPV vaccine)
  • Flu (flu vaccine) *optional

7-10 years

  • Flu (flu vaccine - yearly) *optional

11 to 12 years - Middle School

  • Meningococcal disease (meningococcal conjugate vaccine)
  • Tetanus, diphtheria, and pertussis (Tdap vaccine)
  • Human papillomavirus (HPV vaccine) *optional
  • Flu (flu vaccine) *optional

13 to 18 years High School

  • Meningococcal disease (meningococcal conjugate vaccine)
  • Meningococcal B (serogroup B meningococcal vaccine) *optional (required for most colleges)
  • Flu (flu vaccine) *optional

19 to 26 years

In addition to seasonal flu (influenza) vaccine and Td or Tdap vaccine (tetanus, diphtheria, and pertussis), you should also get HPV vaccine, which protects against the human papillomaviruses that cause most cervical, anal, and other cancers, as well as genital warts, if you were not vaccinated at a younger age (HPV vaccination is routinely recommended at age 11 or 12 years). HPV vaccination is also recommended for adults through age 26 years (27 to 45 years – consult your physician).

Some vaccines may be recommended for adults because of particular job or school-related requirements, health conditions, lifestyle or other factors. Some states require students entering colleges and universities to be vaccinated against certain diseases like meningitis due to increased risk among college students living in residential housing.

27 to 60 years

All adults need a seasonal flu (influenza) vaccine every year. Flu vaccine is especially important for people with chronic health conditions, pregnant women, and older adults.

Every adult should get the Tdap vaccine once if they did not receive it as an adolescent to protect against pertussis (whooping cough), and then a Td (tetanus, diphtheria) booster shot every 10 years. In addition, women should get the Tdap vaccine each time they are pregnant, preferably at 27 through 36 weeks.

Healthy adults aged 50 years and older should get a zoster vaccine to prevent shingles and the complications from the disease.

Some vaccines may be recommended for adults because of particular job or school-related requirements, health conditions, lifestyle or other factors.

60 years and up

In addition to seasonal flu (influenza) vaccine and Td or Tdap vaccine (tetanus, diphtheria, and pertussis), people 65 years and older should also get:

  • Pneumococcal vaccines, which protect against pneumococcal disease, including infections in the lungs and bloodstream (recommended for all adults over 65 years old, and for adults younger than 65 years who have certain chronic health conditions)
  • Zoster vaccine, which protects against shingles (recommended for adults 50 years or older)

Vaccinations during Pregnancy

Tdap

The CDC recommends that women get the Tdap (tetanus, diphtheria, and pertussis) vaccine during each pregnancy, preferably between 27 and 36 weeks gestation, regardless of when they last had the shot to pass protection to their baby against whooping cough (pertussis). For more information, please visit: https://www.cdc.gov/pertussis/pregnant/mom/get-vaccinated.html

The CDC also recommends family members and caregivers get the Tdap vaccine to provide indirect protection to their babies. When your baby’s family members and caregivers get a whooping cough vaccine they are not only protecting their own health but also forming a “cocoon” of disease protection around the baby during the first few months of life.

Encourage others to get a whooping cough vaccine at least 2 weeks before meeting your baby if they are not up-to-date with their whooping cough vaccines.

Flu

Pregnant people are more likely to have severe illness from flu, possibly due to changes in immune, heart, and lung functions during pregnancy.

Make sure to receive your yearly flu vaccine —it’s the best way for a pregnant woman to protect against the flu and protect the baby for several months after birth from flu-related complications.

Contact Information

Phone: (765) 659-6385

Address
1234 Rossville Ave
Frankfort, IN 46041

Birth & Death Records
Vitalrecords@clintonco.com

Environmental Health
Environmental@clintonco.com

Food & Vector Control
vector@clintonco.com

Immunization Clinic
immunization@clintonco.com
(Medicaid, No Insurance, or Commercial Insurance)

Public Health Nurse
nursing@clintonco.com

Preparedness & MRC Coordinator
preparedness@clintonco.com

Payment Information

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