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Deer Reduction Zones

Deer Reduction Zones give hunters opportunities to harvest deer in defined urban areas and along portions of Indiana highways, in addition to statewide bag limits.

NOTE: Hunters must secure permission from landowners and/or land management authorities prior to hunting a property located within a deer reduction zone. Not all publicly owned properties within a zone are open to hunting, and those that are may have hunting restrictions in place. For a private land permission form, see Permission to Hunt on Private Lands.

Season facts

  • Dates: Sept. 15, 2021, through Jan. 31, 2022.
  • Bag limit: 10 deer, of which only one can be antlered. To satisfy the reduction zone bag limit, a hunter must harvest an antlerless deer in the Deer Reduction Zone before harvesting an antlered deer (a.k.a. earn-a-buck). The earn-a-buck requirement only applies to the reduction zone bag limit, which is in addition to all other bag limits. See the hunting guide for deer bag limits.
  • License required: Deer Reduction Zone license, resident youth hunt/trap, lifetime comprehensive hunting, lifetime comprehensive hunting/fishing license, or license exemption. A valid license is required for each deer taken.
  • Use of firearms: Where allowed by local ordinances, firearms legal for deer hunting can be used in reduction zones with a Deer Reduction Zone license or to count the deer towards the reduction zone bag limit from Nov. 13, 2021, through Jan. 31, 2022. The season does not override any local ordinances restricting the discharge of firearms and bows.
  • For public land included in a Deer Reduction Zone Corridor, the area that can be hunted is limited to within one-half (1/2) mile on either side of the centerline of the indicated road and does not extend beyond the boundaries of the Deer Reduction Zone Corridor. Contact the property for more information about deer hunting rules.
  • It’s illegal to hunt, shoot at, or kill a deer or to shoot at any deer from within, into, upon, or across any public road.
  • Deer Reduction Zones may be altered annually at the DNR director’s discretion based on deer population management needs.

Deer Reduction Zones

Interactive Mao Deer Reduction Zones

  • Allen County Deer Reduction Zone

    Is as follows:

    • Within the bounds of Interstate 69 and Interstate 469.
    • All of the area in Allen County west of Interstate 69 that lies north of Lafayette Center Road and south of State Road 14.
    • All of the area west of Interstate 69 that lies north of U.S. Highway 30, east of O Day Road to State Road 33, south of State Road 33 to Johnson Road, east of Johnson Road north to West Shoaff Road, south of West Shoaff Road east to State Road 3, east of State Road 3 north to the Dekalb County line.
    • All of the area east of Interstate 69, north of Interstate 469, west of the St. Joseph River, and south of Schlatter Road.
  • Central Indiana Deer Reduction Zone

    Is as follows:

    • All of Marion County.
    • In Johnson County, only the portion of the county south from the Marion County line bounded as follows:
      • West of Interstate 65 and south to the junction of Interstate 65 and Whiteland Road.
      • West along Whiteland Road to State Road 144.
      • Then west along State Road 144 to State Road 37.
      • South along State Road 37 to the Johnson/Morgan County line.
    • In Morgan County, only the portion of the county north of the junction of State Road 37 and the Morgan/Johnson County line bounded as follows:
      • West of State Road 37 South to the junction of State Road 37 and State Road 39 (Morton Avenue).
      • North along State Road 39 (Morton Avenue) from its junction with State Road 37 to State Road 67.
      • North along State Road 67 from its junction with State Road 39 to Indiana Street (Mooresville, IN).
      • North along Indiana Street (State Road 267) from its junction with State Road 67 to State Road 42 (High Street).
      • West along State Road 42 (High Street) from its junction with Indiana Street (State Road 267) to State Road 267.
      • North along State Road 267 to the Morgan/Hendricks County line.
    • In Hendricks County, only the portion of the county east of State Road 267 from the Morgan County line north to the Boone County line.
    • In Boone County, only the portion of the county east of State Road 267 from the Hendricks County line north to Interstate 65, then bounded as follows:
      • From Interstate 65 south to State Road 334.
      • Then east to Ford Road/County Road 975 East/Pleasantview Road.
      • Then north to County Road 300 South.
      • Then from County Road 300 South east to the Hamilton County line.
    • In Hamilton County, only the portion of the county south of State Road 32 from the Boone County line east to U.S. Highway 31, then bounded as follows:
      • North along U.S. Highway 31 to 236th Street.
      • East along 236th Street to State Road 19.
      • South along State Road 19 to State Road 32.
      • East along State Road 32 to the Madison County line.
  • Cordry-Sweetwater Deer Reduction Zone

    Is the portion of Brown County contained within the boundaries of the Cordry-Sweetwater Conservancy District.

  • Griffy Lake Nature Preserve Deer Reduction Zone

    Is the portion of Monroe County contained within the boundaries of Griffy Lake Nature Preserve.

  • Evansville Deer Reduction Zone

    Portion of Vanderburgh County south of East Boonville-New Harmony Road, except the:

    • Area south of Interstate 164/Veteran’s Memorial Parkway (from the Warrick County line to the east extending to where it intersects Main Street of Evansville along the Ohio River Shore to the west); and
    • Area south of the intersection of Broadway Avenue and the Posey County Line (to the west) extending east to Bayou Creek Road and east to the Ohio River (with Bayou Creek Road extending east to the Ohio River).
  • Lafayette Deer Reduction Zone

    Portion in Tippecanoe County bounded as follows:

    • To the east, starting at the junction of Interstate 65 and County Road 600 North, following Interstate 65 south to the junction of State Road 38.
    • Along State Road 38 from the junction of Interstate 65 and State Road 38 west to Veterans Memorial Parkway (County Road 350 South), then south following Veterans Memorial Parkway west to the junction with U.S. Highway 231 (State Road 52).
    • From the junction of Veterans Memorial Parkway (County Road 350 South) and U.S. Highway 231, following U.S. Highway 231 (State Road 52) north to the junction with State Road 25.
    • From the junction of State Road 25 and U.S. Highway 231 south along State Road 25 to the junction of County Road 300 South and State Road 25 South.
    • From the junction of State Road 25 South and County Road 300 South, west along County Road 300 South to the junction of County Road 300 South and County Road 700 West.
    • From the junction of County Road 700 West and County Road 300 South north along County Road 700 West to the junction of County Road 700 West and Division Road (South River Road).
    • From the junction of County Road 700 West and Division Road (South River Road), east along Division Road (South River Road) to the junction of Division Road (South River Road) and South Newman Road.
    • From the junction of South Newman Road and Division Road (South River Road) north along South Newman Road to the junction of South Newman Road and State Road 26 (State Street).
    • From the junction of South Newman Road and State Road 26 (State Street) east along State Road 26 (State Street) to the junction of State Road 26 (State Street) and U.S. Highway 231 (State Road 52).
    • North along U.S. Highway 231 from the junction of State Road 26 (State Street) and U.S. Highway 231 (State Road 52) to the junction of U.S. Highway 231 (State Road 52) and State Road 52 (U.S. Highway 231).
    • West along State Road 52 from the junction of State Road 52 and U.S. Highway 231 (State Road 52) to the junction of State Road 52 and County Road 400 West.
    • North along County Road 400 West from its junction with State Road 52 (U.S. Highway 231) to the junction of County Road 400 West and County Road 375 West.
    • North along County Road 375 West from its junction with County Road 400 West to the junction of County Road 375 West and County Road 600 North.
    • East along County Road 600 North from its junction with County Road 375 West to the junction of County Road 600 North and Interstate 65.
  • Lake County Deer Reduction Zone

    Is as follows:

    • The portion of the county north of the intersection of the Indiana State line and 151st Avenue.
    • 151st Avenue east to U.S. Highway 41.
    • U.S. Highway 41 south to State Road 2.
    • State Road 2 east to Interstate 65.
    • Interstate 65 north to 145th Avenue.
    • 145th Avenue east to U.S. Highway 231
    • U.S. Highway 231 south to the Porter County line.
  • Porter County Deer Reduction Zone

    Is as follows:

    • That portion of the county north of the intersection of U.S. Highway 231 and the Lake/Porter County line.
    • Then east along U.S. Highway 231 to State Road 2.
    • Then north along State Road 2 north to Division Road.
    • State Road 2 east to Interstate 65.
    • Then east along Division Road to the LaPorte County line.
  • Michigan City/LaPorte Deer Reduction Zone

    Is the portion of LaPorte County bounded by the following:

    • The intersection of the Porter/LaPorte County line and Interstate 94 east to the junction of Interstate 94 and Johnson Road.
    • From the junction of Interstate 94 and Johnson Road south to the junction of Johnson Road and County Road 500 West.
    • South along County Road 500 West from its junction with Johnson Road to the junction of County Road 500 West and State Road 2.
    • East along State Road 2 from its junction with County Road 500 West to the junction of State Road 2 and State Road 39 (Longwood Drive).
    • South along State Road 39 (Longwood Drive) from its junction with State Road 2 to the junction of County Road 400 South.
    • East along County Road 400 South from its junction with State Road 2 to County Road 300 East.
    • North along County Road 300 East from its junction with County Road 400 South to Division Road.
    • West along Division Road from its junction with County Road 300 East to County Road 250 East.
    • North along County Road 250 East from its junction with Division Road to County Road 150 North.
    • West along County Road 150 North from its junction with County Road 250 East to Fail Road.
    • North along North Fail Road from its junction with County Road 150 North to U.S. Highway 20.
    • West along U.S. Highway 20 from its junction with North Fail Road to the junction of U.S. Highway 20 and Interstate 94.
    • North along Interstate 94 from its junction with U.S. Highway 20 to the Indiana/Michigan State Line.
  • Muncie Deer Reduction Zone

    Is the portion of Delaware County bounded by the following:

    • The intersection of Yorktown-Gaston Pike (County Road 600 West) and State Road 332 East along State Road 332 to Nebo Road.
    • North along Nebo Road from its junction with State Road 332 to County Road 500 North (Royerton Road).
    • East along County Road 500 North (Royerton Road) from its junction with North Nebo Road to U.S. Highway 35.
    • South along U.S. Highway 35 from its junction with County Road 500 North (Royerton Road) to State Road 67.
    • South along State Road 67 from its junction with U.S. Highway 35 to County Road 400 South.
    • West along County Road 400 South from its junction with State Road 67 to South Marsh Avenue (County Road 600 West).
    • North along Marsh Avenue (County Road 600 West) from its junction with County Road 400 South to State Road 32.
    • East along State Road 32 from its junction with Marsh Avenue to Tiger Drive (County Road 575 West).
    • North along Tiger Drive (County Road 575 West) from its junction with State Road 32 to River Road.
    • West along River Road from its junction with Tiger Drive to Yorktown-Gaston Pike (County Road 600 West).
    • North along Yorktown-Gaston Pike (County Road 600 West) to its intersection with State Road 332
  • South Bend/Mishawaka/Elkhart Deer Reduction Zone

    Is the portions of Saint Joseph and Elkhart Counties bounded by the following:

    • The junction of U.S. Highway 31 and the Indiana/Michigan State Line south along U.S. Highway 31 to the junction with U.S. Highway 20.
    • East along U.S. Highway 20 (U.S. Highway 31) to County Road 17.
    • North along County Road 17 from its junction with U.S. Highway 20 to the Indiana/Michigan State Line.
  • Warsaw Deer Reduction Zone

    Is the portion of Kosciusko County bounded by the following:

    • The intersection of State Road 15 and Levi Lee Road East to the junction of Levi Lee Road and County Road 100 East.
    • South along County Road 100 East from its junction with Levi Lee Road to County Road 450 North.
    • East along County Road 450 North from its junction with County Road 100 East to Chapman Lake Drive.
    • South along Chapman Lake Drive from its junction with County Road 450 North to County Road 300 East.
    • South along County Road 300 East from its junction with Chapman Lake Road to Old U.S. Highway 30 (E. Old Road 30).
    • East on Old U.S. Highway 30 (E. Old Road. 30) from its junction with County Road 300 East to County Road 450 East.
    • South along County Road 450 East from its junction with Old U.S. Highway 30 (E. Old Road 30) to U.S. Highway 30.
    • East on U.S. Highway 30 from its junction with County Road 450 East to Van Ness Road.
    • South along Van Ness Road from its junction with U.S. Highway 30 to Wooster Road.
    • West along Wooster Road from its junction with Van Ness Road to County Road 500 East.
    • South along County Road 500 East from its junction with Wooster Road to County Road 350 South.
    • West along County Road 350 South from its junction with County Road 500 East to County Road 450 East.
    • South along County Road 450 East from its junction with County Road 350 South to County Road 400 South.
    • West along County Road 400 South from its junction with County Road 450 East to State Road 15.
    • North along State Road 15 from its junction with County Road 400 South to County Road 350 South.
    • West along County Road 350 South from its junction with State Road 15 to County Road 450 West.
    • North along County Road 450 West from its junction with County Road 350 South to County Road 400 West.
    • North along County Road 400 West from its junction with County Road 450 West to Crystal Lake Road.
    • East along Crystal Lake Road from its junction with County Road 400 West to Zimmer Road.
    • North along Zimmer Road from its junction with Crystal Lake Road to Lincoln Highway (Old U.S. Highway 30).
    • West along Lincoln Highway (Old U.S. Highway 30) from its junction with Zimmer Road to County Road 350 West.
    • North along County Road 350 West from its junction with Lincoln Highway (Old U.S. Highway 30) to U.S. Highway 30.
    • East along U.S. Highway 30 from its junction with County Road 350 West to County Road 150 West (Silveus Crossing).
    • North along County Road 150 West (Silveus Crossing) from its junction with U.S. Highway 30 to County Road 400 North.
    • East along County Road 400 North from its junction with County Road 150 West (Silveus Crossing) to State Road 15.
    • North along State Road 15 from its junction with County Road 400 North to Levi Lee Road.
  • Warrick County Deer Reduction Zone

    Is the portion of the county south of State Road 62 from the Warrick/Vanderburgh county line to State Road 61, then bounded as follows:

    • South along State Road 61 to State Road 66;
    • West along State Road 66 to French Island Trail;
    • West along French Island Trail to Jennings Street;
    • West along Jennings Street to Old State Road 662;
    • West along Old State Road 662 to State Road 662; and
    • West along State Road 662 to the Warrick/Vanderburgh County line.

Deer Reduction Zones Corridors

It's illegal to hunt, shoot at, or kill a deer or to shoot at any deer from within, into, upon, or across any public road. Watch a video explaining deer reduction zone corridors.

  • Brown County Deer Reduction Zone

    Includes the entirety of any parcel of land, a portion of which is located within one-half (½) mile on either side of the centerline of State Road 46 from the Monroe County line to the Bartholomew County line. Only the portions of Yellowwood State Forest and Monroe Lake that are within one-half (1/2) mile from the centerline of State Road 46 are included in the deer reduction zone. Brown County State Park is not included in this zone.

  • Dearborn County Deer Reduction Zone

    Includes the entirety of any privately owned parcel of land, a portion of which is located within one-half (½) mile on either side of the centerline of the following road segments:

    • US 50 from the Dearborn/Ripley County line east to the Indiana State line;
    • State Road 148 from the intersection with State Road 48 south to the intersection with US 50; and
    • State Road 48 from the intersection with State Road 148 south to the intersection with US 50.
  • Dekalb County Deer Reduction Zone

    Includes the entirety of any privately owned parcel of land, a portion of which is located within one-half (½) mile on either side of the centerline of Interstate 69 from the Dekalb/Steuben County line south to the Dekalb/Allen County line.

  • Fulton County Deer Reduction Zone

    Includes the entirety of any privately owned parcel of land, a portion of which is located within one-half (½) mile on either side of the centerline of U.S. Highway 31 from the Fulton/Marshall County line south to the intersection of State Road 14

  • LaGrange County Deer Reduction Zone

    Includes the entirety of any privately owned parcel of land, a portion of which is located within one-half (½) mile on either side of the centerline of the following road segments

    • U.S. Highway 20 from the intersection with State Road 9 east to the LaGrange/Steuben County line;
    • State Road 9 from the intersection with U.S. Highway 20 south to the LaGrange/Noble County line; and
    • State Road 3 from the intersection with U.S. Highway 20 south to the LaGrange/Noble County line.
  • Madison County Deer Reduction Zone

    Includes the entirety of any privately owned parcel of land, a portion of which is located within one-half (½) mile on either side of the centerline of Interstate 69 from the Madison/Hamilton County line east to the Madison/Delaware County line.

  • Monroe County Deer Reduction Zone

    Includes the entirety of any privately owned parcel of land, a portion of which is located within one-half (½) mile on either side of the centerline of State Road 37 from the Interstate 69 split south to the Monroe/Lawrence County line.

  • Steuben County Deer Reduction Zone

    Includes the entirety of any privately owned parcel of land, a portion of which is located within one-half (½) mile on either side of the centerline of the following road segments:

    • Interstate 69 from the Indiana State line south to the Steuben/Dekalb County line;
    • Interstate 80/90 Toll Road from the Steuben/LaGrange County line (east to the intersection with Interstate 69; and
    • U.S. Highway 20 from the Steuben/LaGrange County line east to the intersection with Interstate 69.
  • Wabash County Deer Reduction Zone

    Includes the entirety of any privately owned parcel of land, a portion of which is located within one-half (½) mile on either side of the centerline of State Road 114 from the Wabash/Fulton County line (east to the intersection with State Road 13.

Deer Reduction Zone FAQs

  • What are deer reduction zones?

    Deer reductions zones (DRZs) target areas that have high deer populations and high human density or use, resulting in concerns about the local ecology, deer-vehicle collisions, and personal property damage.

    The DNR designates an area as a DRZ to manage deer conflicts through sport hunting. A DRZ provides hunters with additional opportunities to take deer in that area. The goal is to reduce deer-human conflict; it is not to eliminate the deer population. Incorporating or increasing hunting helps manage deer populations and increases deer wariness of humans, which can also reduce conflicts.

    The smallest deer management unit in Indiana has traditionally been the county; however, a DRZ allows the DNR to target areas within a county for management. This should allow deer in one part of a county to remain stable or increase, while decreasing populations in another part of the same county. The approach coincides with Indiana’s current deer management plan which is to strategically manage Indiana’s deer herd. That means, in some areas there should be a larger deer population, while in others the population should be maintained or reduced. The DRZs allow managers to target such areas without reducing county-wide deer populations.

  • How are candidates for deer reduction zones identified?

    Researchers identify potential areas with high human-deer conflict or high use by mapping areas with high human density and/or high rates of deer-vehicle collisions. Other conflicts may include reports of deer damage by landowners, requests for permits, or calls for assistance through our district and urban biologists.

    Another consideration is a community’s desires. In some areas, a limited amount of hunting may already be occurring, and a community may be happy with the current level of hunting. In some situations, a DRZ may be counterproductive to hunting access, because community leaders may feel pressured and respond by restricting hunting through local ordinances. Alternatively, communities may ask for a DRZ so they can continue an urban hunting program. Biologists seek local input to determine the community’s reaction to a possible designation.

    An area may be identified as a candidate for a DRZ if there is disease risk to humans or livestock as a result of deer density. Selection as a DRZ would require a series of deer disease surveys and a determination by public health officials, domestic animal officials, DNR biologists and veterinarians that wildlife is a primary reservoir for a disease and that reducing the deer population would significantly lower the transmission risk to humans, livestock, and/or wildlife.

    The designation process results in two types of DRZs: traditional and corridors. Traditional DRZs are established near or around urban areas and encompass a community. Alternatively, DRZ corridors are created along portions of major roadways to specifically address high rates of deer-vehicle collisions.

  • How are boundaries for deer reduction zones determined?

    Each proposed DRZ is reviewed and evaluated to determine how it would affect hunting access and harvest in each area. Boundaries for traditional DRZs in urban areas are existing roads and waterways, so hunters can easily know if they are in the zone. Boundaries include some rural and/or greenspace areas surrounding more developed areas to allow for hunting access. This can be especially important if this is a travel zone for commuters where there are deer-vehicle collision issues, or if hunting access is limited within city limits or incorporated areas due to hunting or firearm discharge restrictions.

    Boundaries for DRZ corridors along portions of Indiana highways are defined by a ½ mile buffer to either side of the road’s centerline and include the entirety of any land parcel intersected by any part of the buffer. Roads, buffers, and parcels are identified using the Indiana Department of Transportation (INDOT) Road Inventory and the Indiana Map Data Sharing Initiative spatial data. Because physical boundaries are not used for the DRZ corridors, it is highly recommended that hunters use the interactive map to determine if they are hunting within a DRZ corridor. Hunters should also talk with landowners to ensure that each parcel they are hunting is included in the DRZ.

  • How do deer reduction zones address problems between people and deer?

    The increased allowable antlerless harvest and lengthened season means that Indiana’s deer hunters can help address problem areas and potentially reduce the need for other measures, such as sharpshooting by paid contractors or the use of deer damage permits.

    DRZs can help communities receive grants from the Community Hunting Access Program. The Community Hunting Access Program (CHAP) is designed to increase hunting opportunities for deer in urban environments and help alleviate human-deer conflicts. The program provides partners with financial and technical assistance to administer hunting programs in their communities. Each partner determines the location and time of the hunts and which hunters can participate. Partnering communities, homeowners associations, parks and other organizations submit an application as described on the DNR website. There are also individuals who are trained to implement urban and suburban hunts that can be contracted to assist with establishing and operating hunts in these areas.

    A designation as a DRZ can also demonstrate an identified need to community leaders to address deer concerns. In turn, this increases access for hunting which can help reduce damage in a targeted manner.

  • Will the deer reduction zone corridors affect the surrounding deer population?

    The DRZ corridors were designed to only address the portion of the deer population whose home range is adjacent to high-use or high-speed roads. These deer may have a greater likelihood of dying from deer-vehicle collisions than deer whose home-ranges are further away from these types of roads. By focusing hunting efforts along these roads, deer may be harvested by hunters rather than hit by vehicles. Essentially, deer hunting replaces mortality from collisions. This principle is known as compensatory mortality and is the basis for managing wild game species. Hunting may also replace other sources of deer mortality. Instead of deer dying from deer-vehicle collisions, diseases, predation, or natural causes, they can be harvested by a hunter. This type of hunting does not add to the overall mortality of the deer population, but rather one form of mortality is compensated for by another.

    Increased deer harvest by hunters in DRZ corridors should result in fewer deer being killed on roads while the overall level of mortality for that subpopulation should remain approximately the same. Over time, the DNR will be evaluating the effectiveness of the DRZ corridors for reducing conflict.