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Indiana Department of Transportation

INDOT > Multimodal Multimodal

With its historic role as a center for agriculture and manufacturing, and its strategic location serving regional, national, and international markets, Indiana’s economy is heavily dependent on freight movement. These freight operations, in turn, have significant impact on Indiana’s transportation system.

In addition to generating a significant volume of freight traffic, Indiana is also a major corridor for through traffic moving between the Western, Mountain and Midwestern states, and the Northeast. As much as one-third of the freight on Indiana’s transportation network passes through the Indiana without stopping. This makes through carriers a significant stakeholder in the State’s freight system.

Indiana enjoys a wide selection of freight movement choices due to its abundant transportation infrastructure and broad modal options.

Highways

Indiana has an extensive network of major roadways that provide truck access across the State. The truck freight network is composed of: Interstate highways; U.S. highways, state routes and other primary arterial roadways, county roads and other secondary and local arterials.

Indiana’s 14 interstate highways – I-64, I-65, I-69, I-70, I-74, I-80, I-90, I-94, I-164, I-265, I-275, I-465, I-469 and I-865 – provide the major backbone for high-volume goods movement around the state. Indiana’s network of U.S. highways and major state routes form a rough grid of north-south and east-west routes, and fill in many of the gaps between Interstates.

Railroads

The freight rail system in Indiana is comprised of three Class I railroads and 39 regional, local, and switching & terminal carriers. CSX and Norfolk Southern have extensive rail networks in Indiana. Each railroad’s principal east-west route passes through Indiana making the state a critical system component for transcontinental traffic and traffic moving between the East and Midwest. The Indiana rail network is comprised of about 3,884 route miles of active rail lines.

Ports

Indiana is bordered by Lake Michigan to the northwest, and the Wabash and Ohio Rivers to the south. As such, waterborne freight is a key element of Indiana multi-modal capacity. Indiana it has significant maritime access to the nation’s two major inland waterways: the Great Lakes and St. Lawrence seaways; and the Ohio/Missouri/ Mississippi River watershed. These waterways provide high-capacity routes to major domestic and export markets. Indiana has three public marine terminals managed by Ports of Indiana. These are Burns Harbor, located in Portage, Ind., on Lake Michigan; Mount Vernon, located in Mount Vernon, near Evansville, Ind., on the Ohio River; and Jeffersonville, located in Jeffersonville, Ind., across from Louisville, Ky., on the Ohio River.

Aviation

Indianapolis International Airport is a major operational hub for FedEx and the United States Postal Service. In this role, it dominates the State’s share of airfreight traffic. There are, however, 12 other commercial airports in Indiana that provide airfreight opportunities for freight movement through either local air carrier service or passenger airline belly cargo.

Indiana’s abundant and well-maintained transportation infrastructure network is a key asset in the economic vitality and growth of the state. Freight operations, in turn, have significant impact on Indiana’s transportation system.

No single mode of transportation will sufficiently serve the growing demand for the movement of goods and passengers in Indiana. Therefore, INDOT continuously works to understand the issues and concerns of the freight community and to effectively plan for freight movement in Indiana.

Transit

Public transit is used by citizens who do not have their own transportation, cannot drive themselves, or who choose to ride for reasons such as energy conservation and environmental benefits. INDOT’s Office of Transit provides financial and technical assistance to 67 public transit systems across the state, which results in support for more than 34 million passenger trips annually. INDOT additionally provides financial assistance to over 100 specialized transportation providers around the state. INDOT’s role in the state’s public transit system is mainly financial – administering millions of dollars through funds including the Public Mass Transportation Fund (PMTF), Rural Transit Program, Commuter Rail Service Fund and the Specialized Transit Fund.

No single mode of transportation will sufficiently serve the growing demand for the movement of goods and passengers in Indiana. Therefore, INDOT continuously works to understand the issues and concerns of the freight community and to effectively plan for freight movement in Indiana.

Online Truck Permitting Survey

Overweight Metal, Agricultural Loads

INDOT Multimodal Pages & Partners

Related Links

Contact Information

Robert Zier
Director of Multimodal Planning & Programs
Indiana Department of Transportation
100 N. Senate Ave., IGCN 955
Indianapolis, IN 46204
317-233-2376
rzier@indot.in.gov