Grasslands for Gamebirds and Songbirds Initiative

Grasslands

Would you like more quail on your property? Do you want to hear the calls of song birds in your area? Are you concerned about water quality or pollinators? If so, consider joining the Grasslands for Gamebirds and Songbirds Initiative (GGS).

The program provides technical and financial assistance to improve or develop grassland and pollinator-friendly habitat in selected regions in the state.

Grasslands are declining across Indiana and throughout the nation. The Indiana State Wildlife Action Plan identifies this loss as the single greatest threat to Indiana’s wildlife species. Many grassland bird populations are already showing significant decline. The loss of pollinating insects and the plants they depend are also a growing concern addressed by this program. Pollinators are important not only for wildlife, but for the health of human populations. Estimates suggest that one in three bites of food consumed worldwide are directly linked to pollination from floral/faunal relationships.

Loggerhead shrikeImproving and expanding grasslands will increase populations of:

How GGS works

GGS is a partnership with other conservation agencies including DNR, USDA Natural Resources Conservation Service, Natural Resources Foundation, non-profit conservation groups, private industries and other sponsors to:

  • Develop and improve grasslands and pollinator habitats in targeted areas in Indiana.
  • Improve soil health and water quality.
  • Improve species diversity.
  • Increase hunting, birding and outdoor recreation opportunities.
  • Improve overall human health.
  • Increase funding to local economies.
  • Preserve cultural heritage.

Eligible GGS areas

GGS targets five key areas of the state known as Focal Regions. These regions have been selected based on such factors as existing quail or ring-necked pheasant habitat and potential for habitat establishment and connectivity throughout a region. Data and guidance from the National Bobwhite Conservation Initiative and the National Wild Pheasant Conservation Plan was also used to identify focal regions.

  • Focal Region 1 (west central Indiana): Sullivan and Daviess counties, Greene County west of U.S. 231, Clay County south of U.S. 40
  • Focal Region 2 (southwest Indiana): Gibson, Pike, Warrick, and Spencer counties.
  • Focal Region 3 (southeast Indiana): Ripley and Scott counties, Jackson and Jennings counties south of US 50.
  • Focal Region 4 (northwest Indiana): Benton and White counties, Jasper and Newton counties south of State Road 10, Warren County north of State Road 28
  • Focal Region 5 (northeast Indiana): All of LaGrange, Steuben, Noble and Dekalb counties.

How to join

Contact: