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National Preparedness Month 2018 Archive

Week 1
Week 2
Week 3
Week 4

 

Week 1

National Preparedness Month: Week 1

Making and Practicing a Household Emergency Plan
 

As part of the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA)’s National Preparedness Month, Sept. 1 - 8 emphasizes the importance of making and practicing an emergency preparedness plan for your home and family.

Making an emergency plan isn’t as difficult as it sounds. There are 3 easy steps you can take to get started:

 

 

Making and Practicing A Disaster Plan

Step 1: Discuss with your family the following questions:

  • How will we receive emergency alerts and warnings?
  • What is our shelter plan?
  • What are our evacuation routes?
  • What is our household emergency communications plan?

Step 2: Consider the specific needs in your household. Discuss all of the important needs and responsibilities your family might have during an emergency situation. Some important factors to consider are:

  • Assigning roles to family members for assisting others in the household
  • Dietary needs (food, water, etc.)
  • Special medical needs (including prescriptions and equipment)
  • Disabilities or access and functional needs (including devices and equipment)
  • Languages spoken
  • Cultural and religious considerations
  • Safeguarding pets or service animals
  • Safeguarding school-aged children

Step 3: Fill out a Family Emergency Plan provided by IDHS, or use it as a guide to create your own specialized emergency plan. A link to the IDHS online emergency plan form can be found below.

 

Creating an Emergency Disaster Kit
In addition to creating and practicing an emergency plan, it is also a good idea to have an emergency disaster kit stocked and well supplied at home. A basic emergency disaster kit should at least include the following items:

  • Water (one gallon of water per person per day for at least three days, for drinking and sanitation)
  • Food (at least a three day supply of non-perishable food)
  • A radio (either battery powered, hand-cranked or NOAA Weather Radio with tone alert)
  • Flashlight
  • First aid kit
  • Extra batteries
  • Cash or traveler’s checks
  • Cell phone with chargers and a backup battery

An emergency disaster kit should always be tailored to you and your family’s needs, so be sure to include other necessary items like prescription medications, items for children and important family documents.      

Disasters don’t plan ahead, but you can. For more information on making and practicing emergency plans, visit the National Preparedness Month website at https://www.ready.gov/september.

 

Related Links

IDHS Family Emergency Plan form:
https://www.in.gov/dhs/2779.htm

Building an Emergency Disaster Kit:
https://www.in.gov/dhs/2783.htm

 

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Week 2

Learning Life Saving Skills
 

As part of the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA)’s National Preparedness Month, the theme for the week of Sept. 9 - 15 promotes the learning of life-saving skills and how they can keep you and your loved ones safe from all types of emergency disaster situations.

For a complete list of natural disasters and information on how to prepare for them, visit https://www.in.gov/dhs/getprepared.htm.

Disasters don’t plan ahead, but you can. Learn more emergency life saving skills at https://www.ready.gov/september.

 

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Week 3

National Preparedness Month: Week 3

Check Your Insurance Coverage

 

As part of the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA)’s National Preparedness Month, the theme for the week of Sept. 16 - 22 encourages you to check and update your insurance policies to ensure your home is properly protected and ready to withstand all of Indiana’s natural disaster threats.

Document, Understand & Ensure

When it comes to preparing your insurance policies for your property, there are three important steps you should follow:

Document Your Property. Create a detailed inventory of your valuable contents. By doing so, you’ll help speed up your claim processing for damaged contents. You will also be able to provide documentation for tax deductions for your losses.

Understand Your Options for Coverage. Whether you have homeowners or renters insurance, it’s important to understand what areas of coverage your insurance provides.  

A homeowner policy typically offers the following areas of coverage:

  • Dwelling (coverage for your house)
  • Other Structures (coverage for garages, decks and fences)
  • Personal Property (coverage for items like furniture, clothing and appliances)
  • Loss-of-Use (compensation if you need to relocate temporarily due to damage)
  • Personal Liability (coverage for accidents that happen on your property)
  • Medical Protection (payments for a person who is injured on your property)

A renter’s insurance policy typically offers the following areas of coverage:

  • Personal Property
  • Loss-of-Use
  • Personal Liability
  • Medical Protection
  • Property Damage to Others (coverage if you accidently damage someone else’s property)

Ensure you Have Insurance Coverage for all Relevant Hazards. Identify all of the different weather related hazards that can occur in the area you live, and talk with your insurance provider to see if your selected insurance coverage options will appropriately protect your home from disaster damages.

 

Importance of Flood Insurance

Flooding is the most common natural disaster in the United States, especially in the state of Indiana. Most homeowner and renter insurance policies do not automatically include coverage for flooding, so it’s important that you talk with your insurance provider about purchasing flood coverage for your home. Basic flood insurance typically covers structural damage to your home, including your air conditioner, furnace, and water heater.

Flood insurance is also available to homeowners and renters through the National Flood Insurance Program in participating communities. For more information, visit floodsmart.gov or call 1–888–4FLOODS.  

 

Disasters don’t plan ahead, but you can. Learn more about how to effectively check and update your insurance coverage by visiting https://www.ready.gov/september.

 

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Week 4

Save for an Emergency
 

As part of the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA)’s National Preparedness Month, the week of Sept. 23 - 30 emphasizes the importance of financially preparing your home for disasters and other emergency situations.

Plan Financially for a Disaster Situation

No matter what income level your family is at, trying to rebuild life after a disaster or emergency situation is challenging. You can make the recovery process easier by creating an Emergency Financial First Aid Kit, which can be started in four easy steps:

For more information on building an effective Emergency Financial First Aid Kit, visit https://bit.ly/2Pcvwtl

Create a "Rainy Day" Emergency Fun

A “rainy day” emergency savings fund to help provide support during a disaster. While a rainy day fund might seem expensive to create, it can easily be built up over a period of time by depositing small amounts from your paycheck into a dedicated account. It is ideal to have at least six months of living expenses saved in your rainy day fund account.

In addition to having a rainy day fund set up, it is also a great idea to keep an emergency supply of cash kept somewhere in your home. Electronic payment options at stores may not be available during a disaster, so having dollar bills on hand will ensure that you can purchase items without complications.
 

Disasters don’t plan ahead, but you can. Learn more about how to financially prepare for disasters and other emergency situations by visiting https://www.ready.gov/september.

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