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Workshop Schedule

Day at a Glance

8:30 – 9:00 a.m. Registration
9:00 – 9:40 a.m. Welcome and Opening Presentations
9:45 – 10:30 a.m. Keynote
10:30 – 10:40 a.m. Break
10:40 – 11:20 a.m. Panel
11:20 a.m. – 12:20 p.m. Lunch and Table Talks 
12:20 – 4:00 p.m. Breakout Sessions: Artist and Community Tracks
4:00 – 4:30 p.m. Putting it Together
4:30 p.m. Optional Mass Ave Public Art Walking Tour (sign up required)

Welcome and Opening Presentations

Welcome from Firefighter's Local 416: Why Public Art is Important to Us

Scott Williams, Vice President, Firefighter's Local 416

Firefighter’s Local 416 has three pieces of public art on their property and has developed a site-specific installation for which they are currently in the fundraising phase. Learn why they have gone all-in on this effort and what it means to the union membership and the neighborhood.

Rushville: How Public Art is Transforming Our Community

Brian Sheehan, Director of Special Projects and Community Development, City of Rushville

Rushville started with one mural and now has integrated art into a multi-million, multi-year redevelopment effort.  Learn what sparked the efforts, why they made the art choices they did, how they found artists, their public policy to support public art, and their plans for the future.

Keynote

Context, Place and Community

Jack Becker, Director of Consulting and Creative Services, Forecast Public Art

Forecast Public Art, based in St. Paul, Minnesota, is a nonprofit arts organization that connects the energies and talents of artists with the needs and opportunities of communities.  Learn how artists are redefining public art every day, what public art looks like now, and strategies to make public art work in and for your artists and your community. 

Panel

Conquer the Fear of Failure: How to Survive Things Going Wrong

Dale Enochs, Artist
Mary Kramer, Executive Director, Wabash Valley Art Spaces
Julia Muney Moore, Director of Public Art, Arts Council of Indianapolis
Miah Michaelsen, Deputy Director, Indiana Arts Commission (Moderator)

One of the reasons communities and artists don’t start public art projects is the fear that they won’t turn out as envisioned…or may simply not happen at all.  This is your chance to learn about ways projects can derail, how to get through the tough times, and share stories about snatching victory from the jaws of defeat…or not. 

Lunch and Table Talks

Grab a lunch and choose a seat! You’re welcome to dine and chat with colleagues or join one of the following table talks to keep the learning going.

How can public art impact challenges faced through poverty, public health, and other tough issues?

Jack Becker, Director of Consulting and Creative Services, Forecast Public Art

What makes a great mural?

Tetia Lee (Executive Director, Tippecanoe Arts Federation) and Cameron Moberg (Artist)

Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion: What does it mean to develop a project that is truly inclusive?

Lauren Pacheco, Arts and Culture Strategy and Planning Consultant, Principle, Marquette Creative LLC

Public Art Network (Americans for the Arts) – Finding the right resources for you.

Julia Muney Moore, Director of Public Art, Arts Council of Indianapolis

Firefighter’s 416: Learn more straight from the artist and fabricator

Dale Enochs (Artist) and Tom Fansler III (President, Smock Fansler Group)

Creating a public art or community art master plan

Rachel Johnson Kavathe, Artist

Breakout Sessions

12:20 – 1:00 p.m. Making it Public

Artists
Jack Becker, Director of Consulting and Creative Services, Forecast Public Art
Wondering if public art is right for you, what it’s about, and where to start? Get a snapshot view into what it means to be a public artist, how to scale up, where to get training, and what it could mean to your career.

Communities
Mary Kramer, Executive Director, Wabash Valley Art Spaces
You think public art’s a good idea, but how do you get from idea to action? What (or who) starts the process, how do you get buy-in and excitement, and how much is it going to cost – or better yet - who’s going to pay for it? Sound familiar? There’s a lot to think about when it comes to public art - from dreaming vs. reality to learning a common language (art for the non-arts person). In this session we delve into best practice first steps for getting started (and some things to avoid along the way).

1:15 – 2:00 p.m. Communities and Artists Working Together

Artists
Pamela Bliss, Artist
Cameron Moberg, Artist
Lauren Pacheco, Arts and Culture Strategy and Planning Consultant, Principle, Marquette Creative LLC
Tetia Lee, Executive Director, Tippecanoe Arts Federation (Facilitator)​

Presented by artists for artists, learn tried and true successful strategies to working with the public and community groups including: getting buy-in and responding to community needs; managing expectations, interests, and changes; and, leveraging their support (and expertise) to put it all together. It’s important to honor what the community wants while maintaining your artistic vision – and yes, you can do it!

Communities
Jack Becker, Director of Consulting and Creative Services, Forecast Public Art
You’ve engaged the community and now you’re ready to bring an artist’s vision together with that community on a project. Learn how to articulate the vision, determine goals, find artists, develop a “Call”, and select an artist to help make that dream into reality.

2:15 – 3:00 p.m. Planning and Creating Together

Artists
Luke Crawley, Public Artist, Owens and Crawley LLC
Quincy Owens, Public Artist, Owens and Crawley LLC​

Now that you’re ready to get started - it’s time to walk through some of the most critical parts of the process: finding and planning for a public art opportunity. In this session, you’ll learn the difference between an RFP and RFQ, how to prepare a proposal, site analysis, liability and maintenance, installation, who’s responsible for what, and most importantly - budgeting.

Communities
Mary Kramer, Executive Director, Wabash Valley Art Spaces
Sean Starowitz, Assistant Director of Economic Development for the Arts, City of Bloomington
Community and artist have found each other. Now what? How do you work effectively together? This is a time for making it legal (contracts and rights), facilitating the artist’s community engagement, keeping those lines of communication open, and embracing the redesign.

3:15 – 4:00 p.m. Managing and Completing the Project

Artists
Dale Enochs, Artist
Tom Fansler III, President, Smock Fansler Group

You’ve been selected for a project – yay! – now what? Let’s deep-dive into the important details like contracts (including VARA rights) and permits, timeline, staffing, working with a fabricator (who does what), signage, what to do when things run amok, and most importantly….making time to celebrate at the end and along the way.

Communities
Dawn Spyker, Public Art Administrator, City of Jeffersonville
The project is underway. What should you be thinking about now? What if the public doesn’t like the art? Don’t worry, we got ya – in fact, we have a whole list of things to be thinking about: signage, planning for maintenance, communicating with community along the way, and most importantly – the celebration!

Putting it Together

Julia Muney Moore, Director of Public Art, Arts Council of Indianapolis (Facilitator)
This facilitated share out of workshop learning is also an opportunity to get info on the follow-up public art opportunity offered by the IAC exclusively to workshop participants! Woot!

Mass Ave Public Art Walking Tour

Don't let the fun end after the workshop! Sign-up for a VIP walking tour of the public art along Massachusetts Avenue. The tour will be led by Julie Muney Moore. Julia is the Director of Public Art at the Arts Council of Indianapolis. 

Click here to sign up for the walking tour. 

Insider tip: there's some impressive public art on the walk between the Firefighter's Union Hall and the CCIC parking lot.