Levi Coffin State Historic Site

Levi and Catharine Coffin were Quakers from North Carolina who opposed slavery and became very active with the Underground Railroad in Indiana. During the 20 years they lived in Newport (now Fountain City), they worked to provide transportation, shelter, food and clothing for hundreds of freedom seekers. Many of their stories are told in Levi Coffin’s 1876 memoir, Reminiscences. As a child in the south, Levi witnessed the cruelty of slavery and, later with his wife Catharine, “did not feel bound to respect human laws that came in direct contact with the law of God.” While many Quakers did not believe in slavery, few were active abolitionists and even fewer risked their lives and freedom to actively help slaves escape bondage. Others in the Newport community who were unwilling to directly help freedom seekers, provided the Coffins with money, extra food, clothing and protection for their work. Levi was a well-respected community leader with several business interests in Newport. Instead of hiding his work, he jokingly boasted about being the “President of the Underground Railroad” and publically spoke out against slavery. He often used the law to his advantage and was friends with Henry Ward Beecher and Frederick Douglass.

  • Admission charged
  • Handicapped accessible