Corydon Capitol State Historic Site

Corydon Capitol State Historic Site commemorates Indiana’s first state capital and follows the development of Indiana from a territory to a state. Vincennes, the first territorial capital, was left on Indiana’s western edge when the Illinois Territory was created and, in 1813, the capital moved to Corydon, a more central location for Indiana’s population at the time. In June of 1816, 43 delegates met in Corydon to draft the first state constitution. Much of their work was done under the shade of a large elm tree. The trunk of the tree, now known as “Constitution Elm,” is still standing. The first state election was on Aug. 5, 1816, and Jonathan Jennings was elected governor. In November 1816, the first General Assembly of 29 representatives, 10 senators and the lieutenant governor met in the new capitol building. On Dec. 11, 1816, Indiana was formally admitted as the 19th state. Corydon remained the state capital until the government moved to Indianapolis in 1825. Corydon, a National Historic District, features shopping and restaurants, as well as Indiana’s only Civil War battlefield.

  • Admission charged
  • Offers group rates, discounts and/or tours
  • Handicapped accessible