IN.gov - Skip Navigation

Note: This message is displayed if (1) your browser is not standards-compliant or (2) you have you disabled CSS. Read our Policies for more information.

Indiana State Library

Library > About the Library > Events > Indiana Jazz History & Cologne Jazz Exchange Indiana Jazz History & Cologne Jazz Exchange

Jazz in Indiana (subject guide to State Library holdings)

Jazz @ the State Library

On October 5, 2013 over 60 Hoosiers and residents of Cologne, Germany celebrated the history of jazz in Indiana with Hoosier icons David Baker and Duncan Schiedt and a unique performance from renowned international jazz musician Andre Nendza along with students from the Cologne College of Music.

Schedule

  • 2:00-2:30 PM: Reception featuring special guest speakers and musicians (Indiana Authors Room)

  • 2:30-3:15 PM: History of Jazz in Indiana - Presented by David Baker (bio) and Duncan Schiedt (bio) (History Reference Room)  

  • 3:30-4:30 PM: Performance by Andre Nendza (bio) (History Reference Room)  

NOTE: Copies of David Baker: A Legacy in Music by Monika Herzig and Duncan Schiedt’s book the Jazz State of Indiana will be available for sale during the event.

Press Releases

Additional Resources

Jazz in Indiana

Jazz in Indiana @ the State LibraryIndiana was not a root-source of jazz, as were New Orleans, the rural South, or the great show-business capitals of New York and Chicago. Its particular place was earned by its development of a style-its interpretation of music from other places. The style might be called, for lack of a better name-Midwestern Jazz, predating the well-known "Chicago" style by several years. It was an authentic "hot" style, so evident in the number and variety of college bands which embraced it, beginning about 1920.

There are historical, sociological and geographical reasons why jazz thrived here. A wide ethnic variety brought together people with special musical talents and traditions. The immigrant Germans brought a love of choral music; the Anglo Saxons contributed folk melody and songs; and the Southern Negro carried north a rhythmic instinct and earthy topical blues, both of which would permeate the new music. All was part of the soil in which jazz would flourish.

Excerpted from Jazz State of Indiana by Duncan Schiedt

Sponsors

Indiana State Library Foundation

Indianapolis Cologne Sister City Partnership Committee

Indiana German Heritage Society

Consulate General of the Federal Republic of Germany