View the Friday Facts Online

 

This Week's Facts:

  1. Online Resource Connects Users to Historical Treasures
     
  2. Census Finds Americans Move Less in 2008
     
  3. One Weekend Left to "JAM" this April

April is National Poetry Month!

April is National Poetry Month. Since its inauguration in 1996, National Poetry Month is held every April, when publishers, booksellers, literary organizations, libraries, schools, and poets around the country come together to celebrate poetry and keep it in the forefront of American Culture.  Thousands of businesses and non profit organizations host poetry slams and other related events, such as festivals, displays, and workshops. To find more information about Poetry Month, please visit Poets.org, from the Academy of American Poets; and use the National Poetry Map to locate festivals and literary organizations across the country.

-------------------------------
Friday Facts is a production of the Indiana State Library

Friday Facts Editorial Team:

Katharine Springer
State Data Center Coordinator
Elisabeth O’Donnell
Federal Documents Librarian
&
Kim Brown-Harden
State Documents Coordinator

Join the FDLP-IN listserv to get the latest government info

New Online Resource Connects Users to Historical Treasures

World Digital LibraryThis week, the United Nations Education, Scientific and Cultural Organization released the World Digital Library.  The WDL features digitized books, maps, manuscripts, films, photographs, journals, and sound recordings from libraries and archives around the world. Browse its contents (via different seven languages) by place, time, topic, type of item, or institution. Once you have selected an item to view, read a detailed description, then open the item and zoom in to see details. You can travel the world from your computer – from a jaguar sculpture created in Veracruz, Mexico between 600 and 900 A.D. to a letter of Christopher Columbus from 1493. Bookmark and share your discoveries instantly via email or more than 40 different ways using the SHARE menu underneath each image. For Copyright information, check out the Legal link at the bottom of the WDL page. Check out the About section for more information about the history of the WDL and its partner institutions and contributors.

Census Finds Americans Move Less in 2008

US Census BureauThe national mover rate in the United States is at its lowest since the U.S. Census Bureau began tracking it in 1948, according to a Census Bureau press release issued Wednesday. In 2008, the rate was at 11.9 percent, meaning only 11.9 percent of U.S. residents moved (to a different residence in the same county, a different county, a different state, or from overseas). This is down from 13.2 percent in 2007. These numbers are from the Bureau’s Current Population Survey - Annual Social and Economic Supplement conducted annually at 100,000 addresses across the nation.  For detailed statistics, including Reason for Move and Distance of Intercounty Move, view the tables on Geographical Mobility: 2007 to 2008, from the Census Bureau’s website.

One Weekend Left to "JAM" this AprilApril is Jazz Appreciation Month

Spring into the end of April with Jazz!  April is Jazz Appreciation Month (JAM). The Smithsonian Museum of American History launched JAM in 2001 as an annual event to pay tribute to jazz as both a living and an historic art form.  It has grown to include events in all 50 states and 40 countries.  In celebration of JAM, the museum joins a diverse group of organizations, institutions, organizations, associations, and federal agencies that have provided financial or other in-kind donations to support this art form and offer different ways of education and outreach about jazz.   The Smithsonian operates the world’s most comprehensive set of jazz programs with Smithsonian Jazz. The National Museum of American History is home to jazz collections that include 100,000 pages of Duke Ellington’s unpublished music and such objects as Ella Fitzgerald’s famous red dress, Dizzy Gillespie’s angled trumpet, John Coltrane’s A Love Supreme manuscript and Benny Goodman’s clarinet. The museum has just reopened after a two-year renovation.