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    REDISTRICTING 2011

    2011-2021 Districts Adopted:

    Changes to Indiana's 50 state senate districts, 100 house districts and nine congressional districts have been established under House Enrolled Acts 1601 and 1602.  Click below to view the maps in greater detail.

                       State Senate                                      State House of Representatives      

                                                       

                     Printable PDF>>                                                Printable PDF>>
                     Interactive Map>>                                              Interactive Map>>

                                                  U.S. Congressional 

                                          

                                         Printable PDF>>
                                                    Interactive Map>>                          


    Indiana Senate Democrats answer your top redistricting questions

    What is redistricting?
    In order to ensure all Indiana constituents are equally represented, legislators and state officials redraw the state legislative and congressional districts to account for changes in the population that have taken shape over the past decade. This allows for a statewide compliance with the "one-person, one vote" principle, which was established as part of the Voting Rights Act of 1965.

    How often are districts redrawn?
    Redistricting takes place every 10 years following the release of newly-accumulated U.S. census data.

    Who redraws the districts?
    In a few states new districts are drawn by a non-partisan commission and in others it is done by state legislatures. More. Reapportionment of U.S. House and state legislative districts is mandated by the U.S. Constitution, and is largely the responsibility of state legislatures. However, in a few states those lines are drawn by a non-partisan commission. Several states use non-partisan or bi-partisan redistricting commissions composed of non-office-holding citizens. Other states use redistricting commissions that are wholly composed of elected officials. In Indiana, members of the Indiana General Assembly create new districts. Click here to see who controls redistricting in each U.S. state. 

    Although an independent redistricting commission has been introduced numerous times in Indiana, the idea has not been implemented. In 2011, SB 468 was introduced by Senate Democrat Leader Vi Simpson to establish an independent commission to "create, hold hearings on, take public comment about and recommend plans to redraw general assembly districts and congressional districts." The proposal would allow the General Assembly to convene to enact new maps at a time outside the traditional meeting dates, allowing more time for deliberation and public input on proposed maps. Despite public support, this bill was not given a hearing in the Senate.

    How do districts determine Indiana's representation at a federal level?
    Indiana has nine congressional districts, each represented by one federal legislator in the U.S. Congress. More. Indiana has nine congressional districts, each represented by one federal legislator in the U.S. Congress. Each state also has two U.S. Senators who represent the entire state. While the number of state legislative seats in Indiana is set, population changes have had a dramatic impact on the number of congressional districts the state contains. Indiana once had 13 congressional members, but now has nine.

    How can we be sure our new districts will be fair?
    Drawing new maps is a long and difficult process. The process of redrawing legislative districts provides that each district contain approximately the same number of citizens. The following standards are expected to be upheld, and public input is critical in ensuring these are met: More. Drawing new maps is a long and difficult process. The process of redrawing legislative districts provides that each district contain approximately the same number of citizens. The following standards are expected to be upheld, and public input is critical in ensuring these are met:

    • Preservation of neighborhoods
    • Precincts left intact
    • Preservation of communities of interest
    • Simply shaped, with rational, logical deviations
    • Protection of minority voters
    • Compactness to ensure connection between elected officials and constituents
    • Time for public review and input on proposals 
    • Respect for county lines