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Indiana State Department of Health

ISDH Home > Reports > Data Users Guide > Table of Contents > Reportable vs. Non-Reportable Conditions/Diseases/Events Reportable vs. Non-Reportable Conditions/Diseases/Events

Many health conditions, diseases and events are reportable by Indiana law; however, there are a number of conditions/diseases that are not reportable.  For those conditions that are not reportable, some information is available from the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, which is a random telephone survey of adults age 18 years and over that is done in partnership with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.  Below is a list of the conditions and diseases that are reportable and non-reportable.

Reportable Conditions and Diseases

Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome (AIDS)

Animal Bites

Anthrax

Babesiosis

Botulism

Brucellosis

Campylobacteriosis

Chancroid

Chlamydia trachomatis, genital infection

Cholera

Cryptosporidiosis

Cyclospora

Diphtheria

Ehrlichiosis

Encephalitis, arboviral, Calif., EEE, WEE, SLE, West Nile

Escherichia coli, infection (including E. coli 0157:H7 and other enterohemorrhagic types)

Gonorrhea

Granuloma inguinale

Haemophilis influenzae invasive disease

Hansen's Disease (leprosy)

Hantavirus pulmonary syndrome

Hemolytic uremic syndrome, postdiarrheal

Hepatitis, viral, Type A

Hepatitis, viral, Type B

Hepatitis, viral, Type B, pregnant woman (acute and chronic) or perinatally exposed infant

Hepatitis, viral, Type C (acute)

Hepatitis, viral, Type Delta

Hepatitis, viral, unspecified

Histoplasmosis

HIV infection/disease

HIV infection/disease, pregnant woman or perinatally exposed infant

Legionellosis

Leptospirosis

Listeriosis

Lyme Disease

Lymphogranuloma venereum

Malaria

Measles (rubeola)

Meningitis aseptic

Meningococcal disease, invasive

Mumps

Pertussis

Plague

Poliomyelitis

Psittacosis

Q Fever

Rabies in humans or animals (confirmed and suspect animals with human exposure)

Rabies, postexposure treatment

Rocky Mountain spotted fever

Rubella (German measles)

Rubella congenital syndrome

Salmonellosis

Shigellosis

Staphylococcus aureus, vancomycin-resistance level of MIC greater than or equal to 8 micrograms/ml

Streptococcus pneumoniae, invasive disease and antimicrobial resistance pattern

Streptococcus, Group A, invasive disease

Streptococcus, Group B, invasive disease

Syphilis

Tetanus

Toxic shock syndrome

Trichinosis

Tuberculosis, cases and suspects

Tularemia

Typhoid Fever, cases and carriers

Typhus, endemic (flea borne)

Varicella, resulting in hospitalization or death

Yellow Fever Yersiniosis  

Non-Reportable Conditions and Diseases

Amebiasis

Arthritis

Asthma

Cytomegalovirus

Diabetes

Divorce

Fifth Disease

Giardiasis

Hand, Foot and Mouth disease

Mononucleosis (Epstein-Barr Virus)

Obesity

Pediculosis (lice)

Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV)

Scabies

Scarlet Fever

Vancomycin resistant Enterococcus

Varicella and Shingles

Vibriosis

Estimates of Conditions Available from the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System*

Arthritis

Asthma

Diabetes

Heart Disease/Stroke

Overweight/Obesity

Tobacco Use

*Estimates may not be available for each year.

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