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Indiana State Department of Health

Healthy Vending Healthy Vending

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Background and Introduction

Indiana is facing a health crisis in regards to the percentage of our citizens that are overweight and/or obese. The Indiana State Department of Health’s (ISDH) Strategic Plan has baseline figures of overweight adults at 61.3% in 2002 and obese adults at 26.01% in 2003. In response to this problem, ISDH developed strategies to increase public awareness of healthy eating and activities, to promote healthy life styles, and prevent obesity and related chronic diseases. The Healthy Vending Machine/Healthy Corner is one of the special projects initiated by the Community Nutrition/Obesity Prevention Division (CNOP) in collaboration with ISDH Operational Services and the Indiana Family Social Services Administration. The CNOP staff and the ISDH Special Consultant Team adopted guidelines from the Fit City/Fit Schools campaign in San Antonio, Texas.

Guidelines for Snacks

Healthiest
• 3 grams of Total Fat or fewer per serving

Healthier
• 5 grams of Total Fat or fewer per serving

Five percent or less of the daily value for nutrients is considered low. Twenty percent or more of a nutrient is considered high. Total fat, saturated fat, cholesterol, and sodium should be low. Fiber, vitamin A, Vitamin, C, Calcium, and Iron should be high.

Rationale

Fat: High-fat diets are linked to higher blood cholesterol levels and greater chance for heart disease. High-fat foods are often high in calories.

Nuts and Seeds: Nuts and Seeds are high in monounsaturated fat, which can help lower “bad” LDL cholesterol and maintain “good” HDL cholesterol. Nuts and Seeds have been shown in many studies to reduce the risk of having a heart attack.

Portion size: Portion size in not defined because it varies among products. However, the preference is for smaller portioned products. Be aware that a package may contain more than one serving. Two ounces or less is usually one serving.

 
Healthiest Healthier Excluded
Animal crackers, graham crackers Granola bars, whole-grain fruit bars, fig bars Doughnuts, jumbo muffins, snack cakes, toaster pastries
None None Candy, chocolate bars, marshmallow/cereal treats
None Baked chips, corn nuts, rice cakes, cereal/nut mix Regular chips, cheese flavored crackers, cracker sandwiches
Nuts and Seeds, dry roasted Nuts with light sugar covering, honey roasted, trail mix without candy pieces Candy or yogurt covered nuts
Fat free popcorn Light popcorn Butter, movie style, or kettle corn popcorn
Beef jerky None Sausage sticks, pork rinds
Low fat light yogurt Low fat or light yogurt Regular yogurt with fruit flavors
None Sugar free gelatin, fat free sugar free pudding None

 

Guidelines for Beverages

Healthiest
• Milk – Skim, Nonfat or 1%
• Water – Pure
• Juice – 100% pure fruit or vegetable juice

Healthier
• Milk – 2%
• Water – Flavored or vitamin/mineral enhanced
• Low-calorie Beverages - <50 calories per 12 oz. serving
• Juice – 50% pure fruit or vegetable juice

Five percent or less of the daily value for nutrients is considered low. Twenty percent or more of a nutrient is considered high. Total fat, saturated fat, cholesterol, and sodium should be low. Fiber, vitamin A, Vitamin, C, Calcium, and Iron should be high.

Rationale

Milk: Milk in any form provides vitamins and minerals, but the low-fat and non-fat versions are preferred.

Water: Pure water is preferred, but water that is flavored may be more attractive to someone who doesn’t drink plain water. The vitamin-enhanced waters may benefit people with specific nutritional needs.

Juices: Fruit and vegetable juices that contain at least 50% juice. Many fruit ades, cocktails and beverages only contain 10-20% actual fruit juice.

Low calorie: Beverages containing 50 calories or fewer per 12 oz. serving are healthier options. Artificially sweetened drinks are not as healthy as pure water, but may be a healthy alternative for people trying to watch their weight or manage their diabetes.

 
Healthiest Healthier Excluded
Milk, Skim, non-fat, 1% Milk 2%, Soy milk None
100% juice drinks At least 50% juice Fruit cocktails, punches, beverages (Sunny D)
Water, pure Flavored or vitamin enhanced, fitness water, sparkling water, Crystal Light None
None Low calorie, diet soda, low cal iced tea, low cal coffee, caffeine free Regular soft drinks, sports drinks, Cappuccinos, Mochaccinos, Frappaccinos

Guidelines for Fruits & Vegetables

Healthiest – Fresh, unprocessed

Healthier– Frozen or canned in light syrup or own juice

Five percent or less of the daily value for nutrients is considered low. Twenty percent or more of a nutrient is considered high. Total fat, saturated fat, cholesterol, and sodium should be low. Fiber, vitamin A, Vitamin, C, Calcium, and Iron should be high.

Rationale

Fruits: Fruits often lose valuable nutrients when processed. There are added calories in the packing syrup. Although fruits may be high in carbohydrates, they provide many vitamins, minerals, anti-oxidants and dietary fiber that are beneficial to an overall balanced diet.

Vegetables: Vegetables also often lose valuable nutrients when processed. Many canned vegetables may be higher in sodium. Most vegetables are naturally low in fat, carbohydrates, and calories. They provide many vitamins, minerals, anti-oxidants and dietary fiber that are beneficial to an overall balanced diet.

 
Healthiest Healthier Excluded
Fresh fruits and vegetables Frozen or canned fruits in light syrup or juice and vegetables, dried without sugar coating such as raisins Those with cheese or other flavored sauces. Any fried vegetable. Canned fruits in heavy syrup
None Natural style applesauce Flavored or sweetened applesauce
Salads with low-calorie or low-fat dressings, grilled meat toppings Salads with regular dressing, None

Miscellaneous

Healthiest Healthier Excluded
Low fat or fat free Cheese None Processed cheese spread
Frozen juice bars, sugar free, fat free fudgesicles, or popsicles Low fat, low sugar ice creams, sherbets Frozen custard, high fat, high sugar ice creams, frozen confections
Regular old fashioned oatmeal or instant (plain) Lower sugar instant oatmeal Flavored or with added ingredients
Low sugar, high fiber cereal such as shredded wheat, cheerios, bran flakes Low fat granola Highly sweetened cereal such as Captain Crunch, Trix etc.
Soups( broth based) Low fat cream style soups Regular cream style soups
Sandwiches made with low fat cheese, meats and whole grain breads and no added fat such as mayonnaise Low fat or fat free condiments High fat meats such as salami, sausage, etc.

http://www.stonyfield.com/MenuForChange/HealthyVendingProgram/MFCHealthyVendingMachines.cfm
This site offers information on how to incorporate healthy items into vending machines.