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IDOC : Road to Re-Entry

Road to Re-Entry > Re-Entry Services Re-Entry Services


The following is a list of Indiana Department of Correction programs and services designed to facilitate successful offender transition and reintegration from prison back to the community as productive law-abiding citizens.

Indiana Sex Offender Management and Monitoring (INSOMM) Program

The Indiana Sex Offender Management and Monitoring (INSOMM) Program is an innovative program that utilizes the collaborative strengths of both public and private sector groups with the goal of reducing recidivism in convicted sexual offenders. The INSOMM Program provides an integrated system of specialized programming to adult and juvenile sex offenders beginning in the Indiana Department of Correction, through the re-entry process, and provides monitoring services one the offender returns to the community under parole supervision.

The INSOMM Program has three primary components:

  • Facility Based Assessment and Treatment Services:  Within the Indiana Department of Correction, in Phase I of the INSOMM Program, each offender’s risk for committing new crimes is assessed.  This risk assessment will help determine what intensity of treatment the offender should receive and the intensity of supervision they should receive upon returning to the community.  Phase II of the program includes the facility based treatment program in which all sexual offenders are required to participate.  Offenders are required to take responsibility for their offenses and make cognitive and behavioral changes aimed at decreasing their risk for committing new crimes.
  • Specialized Re-Entry Services:   The INSOMM Program provides sex offender specific re-entry programing to sexual offenders six to nine months prior to release.  Offenders are required to participate in educational classes that provide information regarding their obligations to register once in the community. The classes also provide information to offenders regarding community supervision and their responsibilities to adhere to parole stipulations while in the community.
  • Community Based Services:  All sex offenders under parole supervision are required to participate in treatment with an INSOMM Program credentialed treatment provider, and are required to undergo polygraph evaluation at least once every six months to assist to assessing if the offender is adhering to parole stipulations.  Each offender is reviewed and managed by a containment team. The containment team, consisting of the community treatment provider, Department of Correction Parole Agent, the INSOMM Program District Coordinator, meet on a regular basis to discuss each offender’s case, risk factors, compliance with parole, and progress in treatment.

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P.L.U.S. Units

PLUS (Purposeful Living Units Serve) is the name of Indiana Department of Correction's Character- and Faith-Based re-entry initiative.

  • The purpose of the PLUS program is to provide opportunities for inmates to address the issues that contribute to recidivism in the context of a supportive community using faith or character education as a resource.
  • The adult PLUS program takes 16 months to complete while the juvenile PLUS program takes 16 weeks to complete.
  • Curriculum addresses issues such as moral and character development, relationship skills, substance abuse, victim impact, religious/cultural/racial diversity, conflict management and criminal thinking patterns.

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Substance Abuse Treatment Units and Programs

  • The Department of Correction Substance Abuse Program continues to strive to make significant improvements in program efficiencies, and increased substance abuse treatment services to the offender population during 2007.
  • CLIFF Units, modified Therapeutic Communities that focus on treating methamphetamine addiction, have been very successful in graduating offenders from their treatment programs during 2007. CLIFF Units have been established at the Miami Correctional Facility and Wabash Valley for men, and at Rockville Correctional Facility for women. These programs have a strong focus on treating addiction as well as addressing criminal thinking. Preparing offenders for successful and sober re-entry into the community is the primary goal.
  • The Indiana Department of Correction has also established Therapeutic Communities at Westville Correctional Facility and Branchville Correctional Facility. These programs are modified Therapeutic Communities that provide intensive chemical dependency treatment as well as addressing criminal thinking and other criminogenic factors. As above, successful and sober re-entry into the community is the primary goal.
  • In addition, the Department has developed a Guided Self Study which replicates our current Phase One Education Groups. This allows offenders to complete the education component of our three-phase substance abuse program with minimal staff guidance. This frees staff time to provide additional treatment services to the offender population
  • With the strong productivity in the CLIFF Units, Modified Therapeutic Communities, and outpatient programs, the Department has current capacity to serve approximately 3300 offenders on any given day. As we increase utilization of the guided self study, this capacity will increase. Eliminating waiting lists for substance abuse services is a major focus for the Department. We have been able to reduce waiting lists by over 50%, and efforts to eliminate them are ongoing.

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College Degree Programs

Six Indiana-based colleges and universities, Ball State University, Grace College, Indiana State University, Ivy Tech State College, Oakland City University, and Purdue University, provide on-site college degree programs to incarcerated individuals. With more than 2,400 adults enrolled in degree programs annually, 802 offender students received associate degrees and 307 completed bachelor degrees.  The Department’s current research mirrors other national studies in that offenders who participate in college degree programs and complete the programs are less likely to recidivate than any other group.

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GED Instruction

The Department’s research provides a clear message that obtaining a GED while incarcerated cannot be counted upon as a sole ticket out of poverty. However, post-secondary education and training programs are denied to uncredentialed drop outs, but available to GED holders. To the extent that post-secondary education and training provide increased opportunities of employment and subsequent wage gains, the GED functions as a gateway to employment and possible reductions in recidivism. While it is an expensive endeavor to categorize employers’ reactions to GED holders, it appears that Indiana employers accept the GED certificate as a signal of an applicant’s motivation, commitment to work, and other productive attributes. During the prior school year 1,059 incarcerated adults successfully completed the requirements of the program.

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Literacy Education

Thirty-four percent of the Department’s adult population is functionally illiterate. On-going research has found that ex-offenders who are employed post-release are less likely to recidivate. Increasing educational attainment while incarcerated holds the promise of increasing employment opportunities at sustainable wages and ending a repetitive cycle of involvement in the State’s criminal justice system. Indiana’s Correctional Education programs begin with a strong commitment of resources to basic reading, mathematics, and language arts. During School Year 2010/2011,  764 offenders demonstrated mastery above the sixth-grade level at the time of completion.

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Work Release

Work release enables offenders nearing the end of their incarceration to participate in a preparatory program for reintegration into society. Selected adult offenders reside in a community-based correctional facility and are allowed to work and further their educational and treatment interests within the community.

  • There is a strict classification criterion that serves as a risk assessment tool to screen appropriate offenders for the opportunity to participate in work release. Generally, most offenders that are approved for work release are non-violent, having been sentenced for property and drug offenses.
  • The work release program offers the offender a variety of life skills programs to assist in the realistic transition to the community. Additionally, most offenders have experienced significant problems with substance abuse. The work release program offers intensive substance abuse aftercare/relapse prevention treatment designed specifically to address the criminal risk factors the offender will face upon release.
  • While participating in work release, all offenders are serving the remaining 12 months of their sentence to Indiana Department of Correction. If successful with their work release assignment, the offender is released to either parole or probation. 

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Case Management

Indiana utilizes an integrated case management approach to addressing offender risk and needs.  As part of the classification process, the Indiana Risk Assessment Prison Intake Tool is completed.  The data from the assessment is used to develop an initial case plan.  The case plan is a collaborative effort between the case manager and the offender.  It is an evolving document that is reviewed on a regular basis and updated as goals are achieved.  The community supervision agency will build on the plan when the offender is released.

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Community Transition Program (CTP)

In 1999, the Indiana State Legislature passed a statute allowing each county to develop a Community Transition Program. As defined in IC 11-8-1-5.5. CTP is the assignment of an offender from the DOC to a Community Corrections program, or in a county that does not have a Community Corrections program, a program of supervision by the probation department for a period of time from the offender’s CTP commencement date until the offender completes his or her fixed term of imprisonment, less any applicable credit time. Specific rules are established by each county based on its available programs and the individual needs of offenders.

  • Everyone committed to DOC under IC 35-50 is eligible for CTP except the following:
    • Those sentenced to less than 2 years in the DOC.
    • Those with active non-DOC warrants, detainers, or pending charges.
    • Those who do not meet the notification time requirements specified in IC 11-10-11.5.
    • Those who are not residents of Indiana.
    • Those with indeterminate life sentences.
    • Those sentenced to life without parole.
    • Those sentenced to death.
    • Those who are safe keepers, pre-disposition, and misdemeanants.
  • Those convicted of a Class D felony may begin CTP 60 days prior to their Earliest Possible Release Date (EPRD). Those convicted of a Class C felony may begin CTP 90 days prior to their EPRD. Those convicted of a Class A or B felony will be eligible no more than 120 days prior to their EPRD.
  • If an offender violates CTP rules, Community Corrections and probation have the authority to return an offender back to DOC. They may also hold conduct adjustment hearings and sanction an offender in the same manner as if he or she were in a DOC facility.
  • Offenders do not need to sign up for CTP. Rather, when an offender becomes eligible, the CTP staff notifies the sentencing court(s), the county prosecutor where the case originated, and the Community Corrections agency or probation department in that county.
  • Offenders will be released to parole, probation, or discharged depending on the terms of the sentence upon completion of CTP. The sentencing court may direct a different type of release, should they so choose.

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County Community Corrections Programs

The State of Indiana provides funding for counties to operate local Community Corrections programs in order to provide supervision and treatment to offenders in their community as an alternative to incarceration or as they transition back into the community.

  • Counties that receive Community Corrections grants represent over 85% of the State's population, and may serve adults and juveniles.
  • Each County Community Corrections program is governed by a Community Corrections Advisory Board as established by statute to formulate, observe and coordinate its local program. Local programs are operated as independent county agencies, by not-for-profit agencies under contract to the county or as a division of the local probation or sheriff's departments.

County Community Corrections programs often include:

  • Residential or Work Release Programs
  • House Arrest, Home Detention, and Electronic Monitoring
  • Day Reporting
  • Community Transition Program
  • Forensic Diversion
  • Juvenile Detention Alternatives
  • Community Restitution or Work Crews
  • Victim/Offender Reconciliation
  • Community Re-Entry
  • Community Corrections programs target offenders in the community who:
  • Are serving sentences in a community-based program versus the Department of Correction,
  • Have been released from the Department through the Community Transition Program (CTP)
  • Are serving a split sentence with a condition of Community Corrections following his/her period of incarceration.
  • Information regarding specific offenders participating in a Community Corrections programs is available through the local Community Corrections Office.

Community Corrections programs are responsible for offenders in the community who:

  • Have been diverted from the Department of Correction,
  • have been released from the Department through the Community Transition Program (CTP), and
  • Are serving a split sentence with a condition of Community Corrections following his/her period of incarceration.

Information regarding specific offenders participating in a Community Corrections program is best available through the local Community Corrections Office.

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Pre-release Programs and Community Re-entry Centers

  • Community Re-entry Centers enable offenders nearing the end of their incarceration to participate in a preparatory program for reintegration into their releasing community. Selected adult offenders reside in a community-based correctional facility and can work and further their educational and treatment interests within the community.
  • A strict classification criterion serves as a risk assessment tool to screen appropriate offenders for the opportunity to participate in CRCs. Generally, most offenders who are approved for work release are non-violent, having been sentenced for property and drug offenses.
  • The CRC program offers the offender a variety of life skills programs to assist in the realistic transition to the community. Additionally, most offenders have experienced significant problems with substance abuse. The work release program offers intensive substance abuse aftercare/relapse prevention treatment designed specifically to address the criminal risk factors the offender will face upon release.
  • While participating in work release, all offenders are serving the remaining 12 months of their sentence to the Indiana Department of Correction. If successful with their work release assignment, the offender is released through a continued step-down community supervising agency.

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Pre-Release Re-Entry Program

Pre-Release Re-Entry Programming is designed to provide awareness and review of self-improvement skills, job-seeking skills, and community and family values necessary to successfully reintegrate into society.
Every attempt is made to address the issues of obtaining adequate social identification, housing, and employment resources before offenders are released.

Individual Re-Entry Coordinators can be contacted by dialing the phone number listed below. Each adult facility has a Re-Entry Coordinator.

             

Edinburgh Correctional Facility 812-526-8434
Branchville Correctional Facility 812-843-5921
Chain O'Lakes Correctional Facility 219-636-3114
Correctional Industrial Facility 765-778-8011
Henryville Correctional Facility 812-294-4372
Indiana State Prison 219-874-7256
Indiana Women's Prison 317-639-2671
Indiana State Minimum Security Prison 219-872-8239
Indianapolis Re-Entry Educational Facility 317-639-2671
Madison Correctional Facility 812-265-6154
Miami Correctional Facility 765-689-8920
New Castle Correctional Facility 765-593-0111
Pendleton Correctional Facility 765-778-2107
Putnamville Correctional Facility 765-653-8441
Rockville Correctional Facility 765-569-3178
South Bend Community Re-entry Center 574-234-5080
Wabash Valley Correctional Facility 812-398-5050
Westville Correctional Facility 219-785-2511

Contact Us
For additional information,
please contact:

INDIANA DEPARTMENT OF CORRECTION

Indiana Government Center South, Room E334
302 W. Washington Street
Indianapolis, Indiana 46204

Phone 1-317-232-5727

You can find a map of Indiana Department of Correction locations on the web at:
http://www.in.gov/idoc/2332.htm

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