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Nonpoint Source Water Pollution

Nonpoint Source > Nonpoint Source Grants Compendium > compendium nav > Watershed Management Planning > Watershed Management Plan Checklist and Instructions (2009) Watershed Management Plan Checklist and Instructions (2009)

Overview

  1. Nationwide, watershed plans funded through Section 319 of the Clean Water Act must meet nine minimum elements as defined by the United States Environmental Protection Agency (U.S. EPA). The Indiana Department of Environmental Management (IDEM) believes that requirements above and beyond U.S. EPA’s nine elements are necessary for successful watershed planning. U.S. EPA’s nine elements and IDEM’s additional requirements are outlined in IDEM’s Watershed Management Plan (WMP) Checklist, which must be satisfied for WMP approval and eligibility for Section 319 implementation funds. This document contains formal instruction on how to satisfy IDEM’s checklist. Each item in the IDEM WMP Checklist is essential for a comprehensive and effective WMP and is required for IDEM’s approval of the plan. Your group will benefit by reading all of the following instructions prior to beginning the WMP process.
  2. Each numbered or lettered item in the checklist and instructions is a requirement to be placed in the WMP. Text beneath the numbers or letters is instruction on how to satisfy the requirements and must be followed. Italicized text in the instructions is guidance and does not have to be followed in order to satisfy the requirements.
  3. The shaded topic headings in the checklist and instructions represent the order that these topics are to be placed within the WMP. Items beneath the shaded topic headings may be ordered how you choose and additional material may be added.
  4. All projects funded by IDEM watershed planning grants, regardless of watershed size, must follow these instructions.
  5. All maps, figures, and plates must adhere to the instructions below and the definitions in the Glossary.
  6. It is the responsibility of the project sponsor to edit the WMP for grammar and punctuation. Final drafts submitted with excessive grammar or punctuation errors will not be approved by IDEM.
  7. If your project area is within the Little Calumet-Galien watershed (HUC 04040001), you must work with the Indiana Department of Natural Resources (DNR) Coastal Program to ensure that their “6217” requirements are incorporated into the WMP. 6217 requires that the WMP addresses agriculture, silviculture, urban and rural areas, marinas and recreational boating, and hydromodifications.
  8. Any questions about these instructions should be directed to your IDEM Project Manager.

Nine Elements of Watershed Plans

Source: Handbook for Developing Watershed Plans to Restore and Protect Our Waters

U.S. EPA’s nine elements include:

  1. Identification of causes of impairment and pollutant sources or groups of similar sources that need to be controlled to achieve needed load reductions, and any other goals identified in the watershed plan. Sources that need to be controlled should be identified at the significant subcategory level along with estimates of the extent to which they are present in the watershed (e.g., X number of dairy cattle feedlots needing upgrading, including a rough estimate of the number of cattle per facility; Y acres of row crops needing improved nutrient management or sediment control; or Z linear miles of eroded streambank needing remediation). (IDEM elements 18 and 19)
  2. An estimate of the load reductions expected from management measures (IDEM element 26). If a TMDL for affected waters has been developed, the WMP should be crafted to achieve or exceed the load reductions called for in the TMDL. If a TMDL has not yet been developed, the plan should be designed to attain water quality standards if possible, in addition to other environmental goals. (IDEM element 22
  3. A description of the nonpoint source management measures that will need to be implemented to achieve load reductions in item (2) above, and a description of the critical areas in which those measures will be needed to implement this plan. (IDEM element 25 and 24)
  4. Estimate of the amounts of technical and financial assistance needed, associated costs, and/or the sources and authorities that will be relied upon to implement this plan. (IDEM element 29 and 31)
  5. An information and education component used to enhance public understanding of the project and encourage their early and continued participation in selecting, designing, and implementing the nonpoint source management measures that will be implemented. (IDEM element 27b)
  6. Schedule for implementing the nonpoint source management measures identified in this plan that is reasonably expeditious. (IDEM element 27)
  7. A description of interim measurable milestones for determining whether nonpoint source management measures or other control actions are being implemented. (IDEM element 28)
  8. A set of criteria that can be used to determine whether loading reductions are being achieved over time and substantial progress is being made toward attaining water quality standards, and if not, the criteria for determining whether the WMP needs to be revised. (IDEM element 23 and 33)
  9. A monitoring component to evaluate the effectiveness of the implementation efforts over time, measured against the criteria established under item (8) above. (IDEM element 32)

Checklist

Instructions: The numbered elements (1-33) make up the IDEM WMP Checklist (2009). The items with boxes are the requirements needed to meet the numbered elements. These items come directly from the WMP Checklist instructions. The WMP cannot be approved until all numbered elements are complete.

Watershed Community Initiative

  1. The reasons the community decided to initiate this watershed project.
    • Explain the concerns that led leaders to initiate the project
    • Explain who the local leaders are
    • Explain how/why they decided to work together
  2. A description of the steering committee and who they represent.
    • Explain how stakeholder involvement was generated
    • Explain how additional stakeholder concerns were gathered
    • In a figure include:
      • Title
      • Number
      • Title and Number in Table of Contents
      • Figure is legible
      • A list of the steering committee members and their affiliation
    • Describe any outreach efforts used to generate stakeholder involvement
  3. A list of stakeholder concerns.
    • In a figure include:
      • Title
      • Number
      • Title and Number in Table of Contents
      • Figure is legible
      • A list of concerns from the steering committee and the stakeholders

Watershed Inventory

Part One of the Watershed Inventory:
  1. A description of the geology/topography as it pertains to the watershed.
    • Explain karst magnitude and general distribution
    • Explain the topographic features that define the watershed’s drainage patterns
  2. A brief overview of the hydrology as it pertains to the watershed.
    • Map(s) of project area showing:
      • Labeled Streams
      • Lakes
      • Watershed names and boundaries
      • HUCs
      • Legal drains
      • Wetlands
      • Labeled Population centers
      • Labeled Major roads
      • County boundaries
      • North arrow
      • Title
      • Number
      • Title and Number in Table of Contents
      • Not smaller than 40 square inches
      • Legend
      • Scale
    • Explain how the following resources are used by the public:
      • Streams
      • Lakes
      • Ditches
      • Legal drains
      • Wetlands
      • Where possible, connect hydrologic characteristics and relevant stakeholder concerns
    • Quantify:
      • Streams in miles
      • Ditches in miles
      • Legal drains in miles
      • Wetlands in acreage
      • Lakes by number in the watershed and estimated total acreage
      • Describe hydrologic modifications within the watershed
  3. Soil characteristics that can affect water quality including, but not limited to, highly erodible soil (HES), hydric soils, and septic system suitability.
    • Explain how soil characteristics impact water quality in the watershed
    • Where possible, connect soil characteristics and relevant stakeholder concerns
    • Map(s) of the project area showing:
      • Labeled Streams
      • Labeled Population centers
      • Labeled Major roads
      • Title
      • Number
      • Not smaller than 40 square inches
      • Title and Number in Table of Contents
      • Legend
      • North arrow
      • Scale
      • HES
      • Hydric soils
      • Septic system suitability
    • Quantify according to the percentage of total watershed area they cover:
      • HES
      • Hydric soils
      • Septic system suitability
    • Include tillage transect information
    • Describe unsewered areas
    • Map(s) of project area showing:
      • Labeled Streams
      • Labeled Population centers
      • Labeled Major roads
      • Title
      • Number
      • Title and Number in Table of Contents
      • Not smaller than 40 square inches
      • Legend
      • Scale
      • North arrow
      • Large unsewered communities
  4. A description of landuse in the watershed.
    • Map(s) of the project area showing:
      • North arrow
      • Labeled Streams
      • Labeled Population centers
      • Labeled Major roads
      • Title
      • Number
      • Title and Number in Table of Contents
      • Not smaller than 40 square inches
      • Legend
      • Scale
      • Landuse layers pertinent to the watershed and stakeholder concerns.
    • Quantify in acreage and percent of the watershed, the mapped landuses
    • Explain how current landuses or landuse trends can potentially impact water quality
    • Where possible, connect landuse and relevant stakeholder concerns
    • Explain the uses of fertilizer on urban and suburban land
    • Explain where pet and/or wildlife waste may be an issue
  5. Other planning efforts in the watershed project area.
    • Explain how other planning efforts impact water quality in the watershed
    • Where possible, connect planning efforts and relevant stakeholder concerns
    • Map(s) of the project area showing:
      • Labeled Streams
      • Labeled Population centers
      • Labeled Major roads
      • Title
      • Number
      • Title and Number in Table of Contents
      • Not smaller than 40 square inches
      • Legend
      • Scale
      • North arrow
      • Areas in need of Rule 5 enforcement and/or areas of unmanaged construction/sprawl
    • Include on the map(s) the jurisdiction of:
      • MS4 Plans
      • Regional Sewer District Plans
      • City/County Master Plans
      • TMDL Reports
      • Other WMPs
      • Urban Retrofit Plans
      • Groundwater and/or Source Water Protection Plans
  6. An identification of threatened and endangered plants and animals that may be found in the watershed and a description of the types of habitat they prefer.
  7. A description of the relevant relationships between the characteristics discussed in elements 4 through 9.
Part Two of the Watershed Inventory:
  • A section discussing checklist elements 12-14 for each 12 digit HUC. If the project is at the 10 digit scale, 12 digit HUCs may be combined into sections.
  • Each section has a map of the applicable subwatershed(s) and all required map information from elements 11-14 may go on these maps
    • Labeled Streams
    • Labeled Population centers
    • Labeled Major roads
    • Title
    • Number
    • Title and Number in Table of Contents
    • Not smaller than 40 square inches
    • Legend
    • Scale
    • North arrow
  1. Data and Targets.
    • For each report, plan, or document whose data is used:
      • Explain the background of the data
      • State the data’s age
      • State how often those data were collected
    • Explain methodologies for collecting:
      • Windshield survey (Watershed Inventory must include a windshield survey or desktop survey)
      • Desktop survey (Watershed Inventory must include a windshield survey or desktop survey)
      • Habitat data
      • Biological data
    • In a figure include:
      • Targets for water quality parameters of concern
      • Targets for habitat data
      • Targets for biological data
      • Title
      • Number
      • Title and Number in Table of Contents
      • Figure is legible
      • Legend
    • If an Indiana State Standard exists for a parameter of concern, target must be at least as stringent as that standard
    • If a NPS TMDL exists for the watershed, target must be at least as stringent as the NPS TMDL target
    • On the appropriate subwatershed map, include your sampling locations and locations from other data as appropriate
  2. Water Quality Information.
    • Discuss data pertaining to all concerns
    • Summarize and discuss data from:
      • 305b and 303d lists
      • TMDL Reports
      • OLQ surface water data
      • Assessment Branch surface water data
      • LARE Studies
      • NPDES facilities
      • Permit compliance
      • Other WMPs
      • USGS
      • Flow gauges
      • Project data
    • On the appropriate subwatershed map, include impaired waterbodies
  3. Habitat/Biological Information.
    • Discuss data pertaining to all concerns
    • Summarize and discuss data from:
      • 305b and 303d lists
      • TMDL Reports
      • OLQ surface water data
      • Assessment Branch surface water data
      • LARE Studies
      • NPDES facilities
      • Permit compliance
      • Other WMPs
      • USGS
      • Flow gauges
      • Project data
      • Data from a desktop and/or windshield survey
  4. Landuse Information.
    • Discuss data pertaining to all concerns
    • Include data from a desktop and/or windshield survey
    • Discuss, at a minimum:
      • Open space
      • Industry
      • Areas slated for development
      • Landuse trends
      • Describe and map on the appropriate subwatershed map(s):
      • Stream miles needing buffers
      • Stream banks needing stabilization
      • Brownfields
      • LUSTs
      • Other remediation sites
    • Describe:
      • Fertilizer use on non urban/suburban land uses
      • Hobby farms and other AFOs
      • Application of municipal wastewater sludge
    • Quantify and then map on the appropriate subwatershed map(s):
      • CSOs
      • SSOs
      • CAFOs
      • CFOs
      • Other non agricultural animal operations
Part Three of the Watershed Inventory:
  1. Watershed Inventory Summary.
    • Summarize important findings, relationships, or trends
    • Map(s) of the project area or subwatersheds showing:
      • Labeled Streams
      • Labeled Population centers
      • Labeled Major roads
      • Title
      • Number
      • Title and Number in Table of Contents
      • Not smaller than 40 square inches
      • Legend
      • Scale
      • North arrow
      • Important water quality and habitat/biology results
  2. Analysis of Stakeholder Concerns.
    • In a figure include:
      • Title
      • Number
      • Title and Number in Table of Contents
      • Figure is legible
      • Each concern
      • Whether the concern’s supported by data
      • Evidence for each concern
      • If the concern is quantifiable
      • If the concern is outside the project’s scope
      • Which concerns will be focused on
    • Explain why concerns supported by data will not be focused on

Identify Problems and Causes

  1. Problems that reflect the concerns on which the group has chosen to focus.
    • In a figure include:
      • Title
      • Number
      • Title and Number in Table of Contents
      • Figure is legible
      • The concerns
      • Problems related to the concerns
  2. The potential cause(s) for each identified problem.
    • In a figure include:
      • Title
      • Number
      • Title and Number in Table of Contents
      • Figure is legible
      • The problems
      • Potential causes. Causes must be a specific pollutant parameter, but secondary causes may also be identified.

Identify Sources and Calculate Loads

  1. Potential sources for each pollution problem.
    • In a figure include:
      • Title
      • Number
      • Title and Number in Table of Contents
      • Figure is legible
      • Sources paired with:
        • Appropriate environmental problems
        • Causes
        • Subwatersheds
      • Provide enough information to explain the magnitude of the source
  2. Current loads for each pollutant identified as a problem’s cause.
    • In a figure include:
      • Title
      • Number
      • Title and Number in Table of Contents
      • Figure is legible
      • All current loads for pollutants identified as a problem’s cause
  3. The load reduction needed to achieve the target pollutant load.
    • In a figure include:
      • Title
      • Number
      • Title and Number in Table of Contents
      • Figure is legible
      • The current loads
      • The target loads
      • The reductions needed to meet the target load

Set Goals and Identify Critical Areas

  1. Water quality improvement or protection goal statements based on the calculated loads. Social and/or administrative goal statements may also be developed.
    • Goal statements include:
      • Problem or pollutant
      • Current pollutant load or level for water quality goal statements or current condition of the problem for social/administrative goal statements
      • Target pollutant load, level, or condition of the problem
      • Timeframe for goal completeness
    • If water quality standards exist for a pollutant, the goal, at a minimum, must be to meet that standard
    • If a NPS TMDL has been developed for the watershed, the goal, at a minimum, must be designed to achieve the reduction in pollutant load called for in the NPS TMDL
  2. An indicator that can be measured for each goal in order to determine whether progress is being made toward achieving that goal.
    • Water quality restoration goal indicators show environmental changes in the aquatic ecosystem or water chemistry
    • Non-water quality restoration goal indicators show administrative success or social change
  3. Critical areas where implementation will be needed within the watershed project area.
    • Identify critical areas
    • Describe the specific water quality pollutant(s) and source(s) in each critical area
    • Critical areas conform to the definition in the Checklist Instructions
    • Map(s) of project area or subwatersheds showing:
      • Labeled Streams
      • Labeled Population centers
      • Labeled Major roads
      • Title
      • Number
      • Title and Number in Table of Contents
      • Not smaller than 40 square inches
      • Legend
      • Scale
      • North arrow
      • All critical areas

Choose Measures/BMPs to Apply

  1. A description of best management practices (BMPs) or measures that would be appropriate to address the goals.
    • In a figure include:
      • Title
      • Number
      • Title and Number in Table of Contents
      • Figure is legible
      • BMPs and measures appropriate for each critical area
      • Identify why that area was designated critical
  2. The load reduction expected for each BMP.
    • Calculate load reductions for applicable BMPs and include in element 25’s figure.

Action Register & Schedule

  1. A series of objectives scheduled to achieve each goal.
    • Identify objectives designed to achieve the goals determined in element 22
    • The objectives should incorporate the BMPs or measures listed in element 25
    • Identify audiences for each objective
  2. Interim measurable milestones for determining whether each objective is being implemented according to the schedule.
    • Milestones for early stages of implementation
    • Milestones for later stages of implementation
  3. An estimate of financial cost (in dollar amount) for each objective.
    • List financial estimates for BMPs and outreach activities, salary, promotional costs, technical costs, travel, training, etc.
  4. Determine possible partners to implement each objective.
  5. Technical assistance needed to implement the plan.
    • Explain the technical assistance needed and who will provide it.
  • Information from elements 27-31 are in a Action Register:
    • Title
    • Number
    • Title and Number in Table of Contents
    • Figure is legible

Tracking Effectiveness

  1. A strategy to track each goal’s indicators and evaluate the effectiveness of the implementation efforts over time.
    • Method that tracks water quality indicators through monitoring, modeling load reductions, or other method documenting environmental change. Social and administrative indicators are tracked through databases, surveys, marketing tools, or other methods.
    • Explain:
      • How indicators are tracked
      • The cost
      • Tracking schedule
      • Possible partners
      • Technical assistance needed to track indicators
  2. A description of future WMP activity.
    • Criteria for when WMP will be revised
    • Project contact information
    • Describe:
      • When the WMP will be re-evaluated
      • Who will be responsible for the re-evaluating and revisions

Instructions

Watershed Community Initiative

1. The reasons the community initiated this watershed project.

Include a brief explanation of the initial concerns that led local groups or individuals to gather enough support to initiate this project. Also explain who the local groups or individuals are and how/why they decided to work together.

2. A description of the steering committee and who they represent.

Explain how stakeholder involvement in the project was generated and how additional stakeholder concerns, beyond the initial concerns listed in element 1, were gathered. In a Figure, list the steering committee members and their affiliation. Briefly describe any public meetings or outreach efforts that were used to generate stakeholder involvement.

If your group created a mission or vision statement, include it in this section.

3. A list of stakeholder concerns.

In a figure, list the concerns of the steering committee and those collected from stakeholders at public meetings or outreach efforts. List every concern.

In your figure of concerns, you may want to group the concerns by similarity. Example groupings may include: Agricultural Concerns, Educational Concerns, and Urban Concerns. Stakeholders surveys conducted as part of your project may be discussed here or elsewhere in the WMP as deemed appropriate.

Watershed Inventory

About the Watershed Inventory:

The Watershed Inventory is a comprehensive inventory that quantifies, describes, and summarizes available monitoring and other watershed data. The goal of the Watershed Inventory is to discover the true current conditions of the watershed and clearly identify the link between stakeholder concerns and those watershed conditions by compiling and examining available data and deciding which of the stakeholder concerns is supported by the data, unsupported by the data, or outside the project’s scope. State if the data related to specific watershed concerns cannot be quantified. If new concerns are found or brought up through the Watershed Inventory process, data pertaining to those concerns must also be quantified, described, and summarized. Many methods, including the Watershed Inventory Workbook for Indiana [PDF], exist for collecting Watershed Inventory data. Watershed groups are to use a desktop or windshield survey.

Data in the Watershed Inventory must be presented in three parts:

  • Part One: Includes elements 4-10, below, and needs to be presented on the entire watershed project scale. This can include information about the historical and cultural aspects of your watershed.
  • Part Two: Includes elements 11-14, below, and needs to be presented on the subwatershed scale. This part must be divided into individual narrative sections for each 12 digit hydrologic unit code(s) (HUC) subwatershed. If topics from elements 4-10 have a particular relevance to a specific subwatershed, it is important to include that information in the appropriate narrative section.
  • Part Three: Includes elements 15-16, below, and needs to summarize the watershed inventory findings and discuss which stakeholder concerns are supported by the collected data, unable to be quantified, or outside the project’s scope.
Part One of the Watershed Inventory:

The first part of the Watershed Inventory focuses on data at the watershed project scale and includes geology/topography, hydrology, soils, landuse, and planning efforts. These topics are generally broad and may not easily be summarized at the subwatershed scale.

4. A description of the geology/topography as it pertains to the watershed.

You do not have to include long narrative histories about the bedrock layers and glacial movements in your watershed unless they are pertinent to the concerns of your group.

If your watershed has karst topography, a description of the karst’s magnitude and general distribution throughout the watershed is required. Briefly discuss the important topographic features that define the watershed’s drainage patterns.

5. A brief overview of the hydrology as it pertains to the watershed, which includes, at a minimum:
  1. A map showing streams, lakes, watershed names and boundaries, hydrologic unit codes, legal drains, wetlands, population centers, major roads, and county boundaries. This can be done on one map or several placed in consecutive order in the WMP. If flooding is a concern in your watershed, consider including a map of the floodplains.
  2. A description of how the streams, lakes, ditches, legal drains, and wetlands are used by the public. Possible public uses worth including are fishing and recreational areas and streams or lakes with development on them. Whenever possible make a narrative connection between hydrologic characteristics and relevant stakeholder concerns. (Example: Stakeholders are concerned about possible health risks of swimming in local streams and lakes. Across the watershed, there are X streams with public beaches and Y lakes with public beaches.) Quantify streams, ditches, and legal drains in miles, lakes by number in the watershed and estimated total acreage, and wetlands in acreage.
  3. A description of the hydrologic modifications (dams, reservoirs, drainage ditches, etc.) within the watershed.
6. Soil characteristics that can affect water quality including, but not limited to, highly erodible soil (HES), hydric soils, and septic system suitability.
  1. Explain how soil characteristics can potentially impact water quality in the watershed. Whenever possible make a narrative connection between soil characteristics and relevant stakeholder concerns.
    • Example: Stakeholders are concerned about eroding soil washing into local streams. 25% of the watershed is covered by HES.
  2. Include a map showing highly erodible soil (HES), hydric soils, and septic system suitability and quantify those three soil characteristics according to the percentage of total watershed area they cover. This can be done on one map or several placed consecutively in the WMP. HES data may be obtained from the eFOTG and turned into a unique GIS layer by associating it with an existing GIS layer of your watershed’s soils.
  3. Include tillage transect information (if available).
  4. Provide a description of unsewered areas. Include a map of large unsewered communities (schools, campgrounds, package plants, 20+ homes, etc.).
7. A description of landuse in the watershed.
  1. Include a map of important landuse layers pertinent to the watershed and stakeholder concerns (Examples: agricultural lands, forests, open water, and urban areas).
    • Quantify in acreage and percentage of the watershed, the mapped landuses.
  2. Include an explanation of how current landuses or landuse trends can potentially impact water quality in the watershed. Whenever possible make a connection between landuse and relevant stakeholder concerns. (Example: Stakeholders are concerned about eroding soil washing into local streams. The watershed has the highest rate of new construction in the state. Stakeholders are concerned about the impacts of failing septic systems. The western third of the watershed is unsewered.)
  3. Include a description of the uses of fertilizer on urban and suburban land (if applicable).
  4. Include a description of areas where pet and/or wildlife waste may be an issue (if applicable).
8. Other planning efforts in the watershed project area.
  1. Explain how other planning efforts can potentially impact water quality in the watershed. Whenever possible, make a narrative connection between planning efforts and relevant stakeholder concerns. (Example: Stakeholders are concerned about eroding soil washing into local streams. The MS4 plan, county master plan, and urban retrofit plan are not integrated enough to minimize disturbance of HES.)
  2. When spatial data exists, include a map(s) showing the jurisdiction of other planning efforts. Applicable planning efforts may include the following:
    1. Municipal Separate Storm Sewer System (MS4) plans
    2. Regional Sewer District plans
    3. City/county master plans
    4. Groundwater and/or source water protection plans
    5. Total Maximum Daily Load (TMDL) Reports
    6. Other WMPs
    7. Urban Retrofit Plans
    8. General areas in the watershed (i.e. the headwaters of Christina Creek or the northern third of the project area) in need of Rule 5 enforcement and/or threatened by unmanaged construction/sprawl. These areas (8b. viii) must be mapped, however the map does not have to be so detailed that individual parcels of land or the identity of landowners can be identified.
9. An identification of threatened and endangered plants and animals that may be found in the watershed and a description of the types of habitat they prefer.
10. A description of the relevant relationships between the characteristics discussed in elements 4 through 9.

Many of the watershed characteristics in Part One of the Watershed Inventory, when examined together, help provide a clearer picture of the water quality issues. As applicable, describe those relationships. Examples of characteristics and water quality issues they illustrate include:

  • Population centers and soils unsuitable for septics—their overlap may show the scope of an E. coli source
  • Topography and soil type—their overlap may show the most important HES to protect from erosion
  • Hydrology, landuse, and population centers—their overlap may show specific types of urban pollution sources
  • Soils and location of construction—their overlap may show HES that need extra erosion control BMPs during construction or hydric soils that should be protected
  • Endangered species and hydrology/soil types—their overlap may show soils that would support needed habitat for an endangered species
Part Two of the Watershed Inventory:

This section of the Watershed Inventory must have a narrative section for each individual subwatershed (12 digit HUC) within the project area. Projects at the 10 digit HUC scale may combine several subwatersheds’ narrative sections into one section if the data is similar across those HUCs. Each narrative section is to include information from elements 12-14 and begin with a map of the subwatershed being discussed. All requested map layers from elements 11-14 can be included on this map. This can be done on one map or several placed consecutively in the WMP.

If information discussed in Part One of the Watershed Inventory has specific applicability at the subwatershed scale, those details should be included when the pertinent subwatershed is discussed in Part Two of the Watershed Inventory, as shown in the examples below.

Example 1: A Regional Sewer District may cover the entire project area and best be summarized within Part One of the Watershed Inventory. However, if the District is installing sewers in subwatershed X, that specific information should be discussed in the section on subwatershed X.

Example 2: In Part One of the Watershed Inventory, data across the entire watershed may show specific landuses where wildlife or pet waste could be a pollution source. Those landuses may dominate certain areas at the subwatershed level, and that distinction should be highlighted in Part Two of the Watershed Inventory.

Example Outline of the Watershed Inventory’s second part:

  • Watershed Inventory Part Two
    • Introduce the sources of data and water quality and habitat/biological targets (element 11)
      • Christina Creek Subwatershed
        • Subwatershed Map(s)
        • Water Quality Information (element 12)
          • Summarize data
        • Habitat/Biological Information (element 13)
          • Summarize data
        • Landuse Information (element 14)
          • Description of general landuse information
          • Description and quantification of landuse concerns
      • Katie-Lilly Run Subwatershed
        • Subwatershed Map(s)
        • Water Quality Information (element 12)
          • Summarize data
        • Habitat/Biological Information (element 13)
          • Summarize data
        • Landuse Information (element 14)
          • Description of general landuse information
          • Description and quantification of landuse concerns
11. Data and Targets.

Describe the background and age of each report, plan, or document whose data you will reference as well as how often those data were collected. Methodologies for collecting windshield survey, desktop survey, habitat data, and biological data should briefly be explained. In a figure, identify targets for water quality parameters of concern and habitat/biological data for the purpose of interpreting inventory data and defining problems. If an Indiana State Standard exists for a parameter of concern, your target must be at least as stringent as that standard. If a NPS TMDL exists for your watershed, your target must be at least as stringent as the NPS TMDL target. IDEM has an online guidance document with examples of commonly used water quality targets. If you have access to the Quality Assurance Project Plan (QAPP) from any of your data sources, consider referencing or including them in the appendix.

  • On the appropriate subwatershed map, include the locations where sampling occurred by your project and, as you deem appropriate, sampling points from reports whose data you will reference.
12. Water Quality Information.

The description of Water Quality Information should examine water quality data relevant to all stakeholder concerns as well as other water quality concerns discovered during the collection of data.

Element 12a-g is a list of data sources to be summarized and discussed as they relate to stakeholder concerns (if applicable to your project area). The age of data should be considered before including it in the WMP. Data older than 5 years can often show trends, but changes in the watershed may affect data’s relevance. When deciding to include any data older than 5-10 years, IDEM recommends careful consideration of watershed changes that have occurred since the data was originally collected. The U.S. EPA Handbook for Developing Watershed Plans to Restore and Protect Our Waters has information on summarizing data.

  1. IDEM
    1. 305b and 303d lists. On the appropriate subwatershed map, include impaired waterbodies
    2. TMDL Report data and conclusions
    3. Office of Land Quality surface water data
    4. Assessment Branch surface water data (include groundwater/drinking water data if relevant to your concerns)
  2. DNR Lake and River Enhancement (LARE) Diagnostic Studies
  3. NPDES facilities, permit compliance
  4. Other WMPs
  5. United States Geologic Survey Reports/Data
  6. Flow gauges (data does not have to be discussed, but may be used to calculate loads as appropriate)
  7. Data collected as a result of this project, including a desktop and/or windshield survey.

Data might also be available from:

  1. Local Universities
  2. Municipalities
  3. Local health departments
  4. Municipal waste water/drinking water facilities
  5. Local storm water program
  6. Soil and Water Conservation Districts
  7. Hoosier Riverwatch
13. Habitat/Biological Information.

The description of Habitat/Biological Information should include habitat/biological data relevant to all stakeholder concerns as well as other habitat/biological concerns discovered during the collection of data. Possible sources of data include:

  1. Those listed above for ‘Water Quality Information’ (element 12a-g)
  2. Desktop survey and/or windshield survey done as part of your project
14. Landuse Information.

The description of Landuse Information is a more detailed examination of landuse than presented in Part One of the Watershed Inventory. It should examine landuse data relevant to all stakeholder concerns as well as other landuse concerns discovered during the collection of data. In order to map, describe, and quantify information about landuse concerns at the subwatershed level, use a desktop survey and/or windshield survey. IDEM reserves the right to request additional information/maps depending on the issues focused on during your project. The following information must be included (if applicable to the subwatershed being discussed):

  1. Narrative information on landuse including, but not limited to: open spaces (i.e. recreational areas, cemeteries, etc.) industry, landuse trends, areas slated for development.
  2. Element 14bi-iii are landuse concerns that the project may or may not have identified. For those concerns that were identified, follow the instructions below on how to describe them. Consult your IDEM Project Manager for instruction on how to describe concerns not listed below.
    1. The following concerns should be described and mapped on the appropriate subwatershed map.
      1. Stream miles needing buffers
      2. Stream banks needing stabilization
      3. Brownfields, Leaking Underground Storage Tanks (LUST), and other remediation sites
    2. The following concerns should be described.
      1. Spreading of fertilizer on non urban/suburban land uses such as: agriculture, forest, and reclaimed mine land
      2. Hobby farms and other Animal Feeding Operations (AFO)
      3. Land application of municipal wastewater sludge
    3. The following concerns should be quantified and then mapped on the appropriate subwatershed map.
      1. Combined Sewer Overflow (CSO) or Storm Sewer Overflow (SSO)
      2. Concentrated Animal Feeding Operations (CAFO), Confined Feeding Operations (CFO), and other non agricultural animal operations such as fairgrounds and kennels
Part Three of the Watershed Inventory:

The third part of the Watershed Inventory is a short narrative focusing on important data and relationships found within Parts One and Two. This section should explain how that information can be used to better understand the stakeholder concerns and the direction they give to the watershed planning process.

15. Watershed Inventory Summary

The Watershed Inventory summary should be a brief recap of important inventoried data. Instead of restating every datum from Parts One and Two, provide a narrative summarizing important findings, relationships, or trends that the data showed. As part of the summary, include a map(s) summarizing the important water quality and habitat/biology results.

The map can be of the entire watershed and include water, habitat, and biology data if the data can be clearly labeled. Every exceedance does not need to be mapped. The purpose of the map is to represent the cumulative data and to highlight the range of results. If the data cannot fit on one map, make two maps.

16. Analysis of Stakeholder Concerns.

Put every stakeholder concern—including those found during the Watershed Inventory—in a figure (see example below), and based on the information collected in the Watershed Inventory decide which concerns are supported by the collected data, what evidence you have for each concern, whether the concern is quantifiable, and whether the concern is outside the project’s scope. Finally, identify which concerns the project chose to focus on. If the group chose to not focus on a supported concern, that decision needs to be explained.

Example:
Concern Supported by our data? Evidence Quantifiable? Outside Scope? Group wants to focus on?
The public doesn’t know who to contact about watershed related concerns Yes County does not publicize which offices have watershed information Yes No Yes
1200 foot log jam in Holtz River No None collected No Yes No
Water contact is unhealthy Yes Area streams on 303(d) list Yes No Yes
Several different groups and agencies are giving conflicting information about the streams and rivers Yes Anecdotal evidence from stakeholders who have worked with agencies No No Yes
Some farms lack manure management BMPs Yes Windshield survey and SWCD confirmed Yes No Yes
Livestock have access to streams at multiple points Yes 56 access points identified during windshield survey Yes No Yes
CSOs discharge with every 0.5 inch rain Yes City records Yes Yes, but we can work on reducing urban runoff Yes
Erosion control practices don’t appear to be used properly Yes Rule 5 inspector can’t keep up with complaints Yes No Yes
The public lacks education about fertilizer use No None, we assume this is a valid concern No No Yes
Watershed restoration is underfunded Yes Zero local funding sources Yes No Yes

Identify Problems and Causes

17. Problems that reflect the concerns on which the group has chosen to focus.

Problems can be thought of as conditions that exists because of the concerns. In a figure, list the concerns and the problems related to them. One problem can relate to several similar concerns. Some concerns may already be phrased as a problem and in these instances may be copied verbatim in the “Problem” column of your figure (see example).

Example:
Concern(s) Problem
  • Erosion control practices don’t appear to be used properly
  • Livestock have access to streams at multiple points
Area streams are very cloudy and turbid
  • The public doesn’t know who to contact about watershed related concerns
  • Several different groups and agencies are giving conflicting information about the streams and rivers
A unified group for the entire watershed does not currently exist
  • Livestock have access to streams at multiple points
  • CSOs discharge with every .5 inch rain
  • Some farms lack manure management BMPs
  • The public lacks education about fertilizer use
Area streams have nutrient levels exceeding the target set by this project
  • CSOs discharge with every .5 inch rain
  • Water contact is unhealthy
  • Some farms lack manure management BMPs
Area streams are impaired for recreational contact on IDEM’s 303(d) list
  • Watershed restoration is underfunded
Watershed restoration is underfunded
18. The potential cause(s) for each identified problem.

Include a figure showing the problems and their relationship to the potential causes. Causes of water quality problems must be defined as a specific pollutant parameter, but secondary causes may also be identified. It is appropriate that some problems and causes will be identical.

Consider the underlying cause(s) for the problems identified. Causes may include specific pollutants, social behaviors, etc. If you cannot identify a problem’s potential cause, it may be that your problem is too broad, and you should try to narrow it.

Example:
Problem Potential Cause(s)
Area streams are very cloudy and turbid
  • Total Suspended Sediment (TSS) levels exceed the target set by this project
A unified group for the entire watershed does not exist
  • Lack of public awareness of watershed issues
  • Lack of unified government strategy about watershed management
Area streams have nutrient levels exceeding the target set by this project
  • Nutrient levels exceed the target set by this project
  • Targeted nutrient reduction education does not exist
Areas streams are impaired by IDEM for recreational contact
  • E. coli levels exceed the water quality standard
Watershed restoration is underfunded
    No effort to educate local officials, foundations, and other funding sources on the importance of watershed protection

Identify Sources and Calculate Loads

19. Potential sources for each pollution problem.

Since most, if not all, sources should have been identified through the inventory process it is not necessary to reiterate them here. Instead, in a figure, pair sources with appropriate environmental problems and potential causes and connect them to the appropriate subwatersheds. Provide enough information to explain the magnitude of the source. Sources are not needed for administrative or social problems.

Example:
Problem Potential Cause(s) Potential Source(s)
Area streams are very cloudy and turbid
  • TSS levels exceed the target set by this project
3 developing sites with improper construction practices along the urban fringes in the subwatersheds Christina Creek and Lilly Run. 6 of 8 stream miles along the headwaters of Kettering Ditch are unbuffered. Approximately 3500 acres of row crops in the watershed are conventionally tilled.
A unified group for the entire watershed does not exist
  • Lack of public awareness of watershed issues
  • Lack of unified government strategy about watershed management
N/A
Area streams have nutrient levels exceeding the target set by this project
  • Nutrient levels exceed the target set by this project
  • Targeted nutrient reduction education does not exist
14 CSOs and urban fertilizer in the headwaters of Christina Creek, Lilly Run, and Kettering Ditch. 35 documented livestock access points and agricultural fertilizer in the subwatersheds Lilly Run, Kettering Ditch, and Rockne Run. 14 of 18 stream miles in Rockne Run are unbuffered.
Areas streams are impaired by IDEM for recreational contact
  • E. coli levels exceed the water quality standard
14 CSOs in the headwaters of Christina Creek, Lilly Run, and Kettering Ditch. 35 documented livestock access points in the subwatersheds Lilly Run, Kettering Ditch, and Rockne Run.
Watershed restoration is underfunded
  • No effort to educate local officials, foundations, and other funding sources on the importance of watershed protection
N/A
20. Current loads for each pollutant identified as a problem’s cause.

Create a figure showing all current loads for pollutants identified as a problem’s cause. There are several ways to characterize current loads for mass based pollutants such as nutrients and sediment. At a minimum, groups should summarize loads as pounds or tons/year on an annual basis. Depending on sampling locations, loads may be able to represent the entire watershed or smaller parts such as subwatersheds or individual sampling sites. Consider what geographic area you want loads to represent when choosing your project’s sampling sites.

E. coli has no mass and its “load” is expressed as a concentration of colony forming units (cfu). Unless your watershed has a TMDL with an E. coli load, the easiest way to summarize E. coli is by averaging your samples. Since the E. coli water quality standard is in effect during the recreational season (April through October) it is acceptable to only average E. coli (as cfu/100ml) during those months; although it can be averaged year-round, if desired. No matter the pollutant, it is acceptable for groups to calculate loads over smaller time periods, such as per season, month, or flow condition. Groups may also calculate loads for specific landuses, using L-THIA, if they choose.

Data availability affects which load calculation methods can be used. IDEM encourages watershed groups to consider what geographic region (entire watershed, subwatershed, each sampling site, etc.) the loads should represent, but does not mandate that the loads be calculated for a specific geographic area or using a certain method. Using models to create loads is acceptable.

  1. Long-term Hydrologic Impact Assessment (L-THIA) - determines the average impact a landuse change will have on annual runoff and average amount of several NPS pollutants including sediment, nutrients, and fecal coliforms.
  2. Spreadsheet Tool for Estimating Pollutant Load (STEPL) - calculates nutrient and sediment loads at the watershed level.
  3. IDEM Load Calculation Tool - uses flow and pollutant concentration data to estimate loads for mass-based pollutants and E. coli.
  4. Purdue University’s website will house the Online Load Duration Curve Tool. This tool will allow groups to input their data and the tool will generate load duration curves. Contact IDEM for more information about this resource.
21. The load reduction needed to achieve the target pollutant load.

The target load is the pollutant load of a stream which meets the applicable water quality standard or water quality target. Create a figure showing the current loads, the target loads, and the reductions needed to meet the target load.

Example:
TSS Loads Amount
Current Load 100 tons/yr of TSS
Target Load 25 tons/yr of TSS
Reduction Needed 75 tons/yr of TSS

Set Goals and Identify Critical Areas

22. Water quality improvement or protection goal statements based on the calculated loads. Social and/or administrative goal statements may also be developed.

Each goal statement needs to include:

  1. Problem or pollutant
  2. Current pollutant load or current pollutant level (usually expressed as a concentration) for water quality goal statements, or current condition of the problem for social/administrative goal statements
  3. The target pollutant load, level, or condition of the problem (the target is your goal)
    • If water quality standards exist for a pollutant, the goal, at a minimum, must be to meet that standard. If a NPS TMDL has been developed for the watershed, the goal, at a minimum, must be designed to achieve the pollutant load reduction called for in the NPS TMDL.
  4. A timeframe for when the group expects the goal to be met. One method of drafting timeframes is to estimate, using the load reductions associated with each BMP, how many BMPs would have to be installed to meet the goal and how long that realistically may take.

Example TSS Goal Statement:

Excess TSS has been identified as a problem. We want to reduce the watershed’s TSS load from 100 tons/year to 25 tons/year (a 75% reduction) within 20 years.

An Action Register (elements 27-31) will later be built to address each goal.

23. An indicator that can be measured for each goal in order to determine whether progress is being made toward achieving the goal.

For water quality restoration goals, select indicators that will show environmental changes in the aquatic ecosystem (such as benthic macroinvertebrate indices, fish community indices, or habitat evaluations) or water chemistry (such as pollutant concentration or reduced loading). For non-water quality restoration goals, select indicators that will show administrative success (such as number of people at meetings, number of field days held) or social change (such as measured change through a social indicators survey). Information on selecting social indicators may be found in The Social Indicator Planning and Evaluation System for Nonpoint Source Management [PDF].

Example TSS Goal Indicator:

Water Quality and Social data will be used as indicators to show progress toward attaining this goal. The environmental indicator will be TSS testing conducted at each site on a monthly basis for 30 months after the first implementation phase is complete. The social indicator will be surveys that measure the social changes created through our education program.

Indicators should be placed after each goal. See the Action Register (elements 27-31) for an example.

24. Critical areas where implementation will be needed within the watershed project area.

Use inventoried data (element 4-14), current loads (element 20) and potential sources (element 19) to identify critical areas where best management practices or measures will be needed to address the NPS pollution causes and achieve project goals.

  1. Briefly describe the specific water quality pollutant(s) and source(s) in each critical area.
  2. Include a map showing the location of all critical areas.
    • This can be done on one map or several placed in consecutive order in the WMP.

How to Select Critical Areas:

Critical Areas are defined areas where WMP implementation can remediate NPS sources in order to improve water quality and/or can mitigate the impact of future sources in order to protect water quality. Because storm water delivers additional pollutants and flow to streams, and excess flow has been shown to destabilize banks and add to pollutant loads, the reduction of flow may be designated as a critical activity if that reduction will reduce a NPS pollutant in a Critical Area. This does not mean that Section 319 funds can address flooding concerns, but does mean that projects showing a decrease in flow reaching a Water of the State may be considered eligible.

Critical Areas cannot be defined as:

  • The entire project area
  • A group of geographic areas which when combined make up the entire project area.
  • A source or landuse that covers 100% of the entire project area (ex: If the entire project area is HES, all HES can not be designated as critical).
  • Every stream and/or every stream buffer (regardless of buffer width) within the entire project area.

Within a WMP and following the above guidelines, critical areas should be identified as one or a combination of the following descriptions:

  1. 12 digit HUCs or smaller geographic areas where a particular pollutant needs to be addressed to meet the water quality goals of the WMP. If the watershed project area is smaller than a 10 digit HUC, an entire 12 digit HUC cannot be designated as a critical area. However, if the project area is one 10 digit HUC or larger, one or several (but not all) entire 12 digit HUCs can be designated as critical areas (Example: Kettering Ditch and Rockne Run subwatersheds are critical water quality improvement areas for E. coli. Christina Creek subwatershed is a critical water quality protection area from future nutrient NPS pollution).
  2. Specific region within a 12 digit HUC or smaller geographic area where a particular source(s) is contributing a pollutant of concern and needs to be addressed to meet the water quality goals of the WMP (Example: The city of Athens that lies within the Kettering Ditch subwatershed is a critical water quality improvement area for urban construction, CSOs, and reducing TSS through the reduction of flow. Christina Creek’s headwaters are a critical water quality protection area from future urban fertilizer use).
  3. Specific source(s), anywhere in the project area, that are contributing a pollutant of concern (Example: The entire Salt Creek Watershed is a critical water quality improvement area for cattle crossings. The entire Salt Creek Watershed is a critical water quality protection area from future CAFOs).

Choose Measures/BMPs to Apply

25. A description of best management practices (BMPs) or measures that would be appropriate to address the goals.

List the BMPs and measures in a figure identifying which BMPs or measures are appropriate for each critical area and why that area was designated critical. Consider right-of-ways, neighborhood association by-laws, zoning requirements, and other ordinances that may impede the ability to implement BMPs in the critical areas. Do not list every possible BMP or measure that would be appropriate for every conceivable circumstance in your watershed—only list BMPs or measures you want to focus on during implementation (regardless of Section 319 eligibility). Your IDEM Watershed Specialist can help identify non-Section 319 funding. Consider defining what each BMP is and how it’s used in an Appendix.

Example:
Critical Area Reason for being critical BMP or Measure
Lilly Run, Kettering Ditch, and Rockne Run subwatersheds E. coli Ordinance Education for Local Planners
Cattle Exclusion/Alternative Watering
Septic System Maintenance Workshops
The city of Athens that lies within the Kettering Ditch subwatershed Increased flow and pollutant loads due to urbanization Low Impact Development Workshops
Ordinance Education for Local Planners
Vegetative Swale
Rain barrels/Cisterns
Salt Creek Watershed Cattle crossings Cattle Exclusion/Alternative Watering
Nutrient Application Management
26. The load reduction expected for each BMP.

Using the Region 5 Load Estimation Spreadsheet Model, STEPL, or other appropriate methods, calculate estimated load reductions for each individual BMP. If a methodology that estimates load reductions does not exist for certain BMPs, state that in the WMP. Estimated load reductions, along with estimated costs, can help you calculate the resources needed to achieve your goals. Insert the load reductions into element 25’s figure (see example below).

  1. Region 5 Model - provides gross estimates of sediment and nutrient load reductions for BMPs at the field level.
  2. STEPL - calculates nutrient and sediment load reductions for BMPs at the watershed level.
Example:
Critical Area Reason for being critical BMP or Measure Estimated Load Reduction for a Single BMP *
Sediment Phosphorus Nitrogen
Lilly Run, Kettering Ditch, and Rockne Run subwatersheds E. coli ** Ordinance Education for Local Planners N/A N/A N/A
Cattle Exclusion (modeled as a filter strip)/Alternative Watering 2 tons/yr 60 lbs/yr 120 lbs/yr
Septic System Maintenance Workshops N/A N/A N/A
The city of Athens that lies within the Kettering Ditch subwatershed Urbanization Low Impact Development Workshops N/A N/A N/A
Ordinance Education for Local Planners N/A N/A N/A
Vegetative Swale 4 tons/yr 9 lbs/yr 8 lbs/yr
Rain barrels/Cisterns N/A N/A N/A
Salt Creek Watershed Tillage Practices Implement no-till (modeled on 100 acres) 12 tons/yr 60 lbs/yr 120 lbs/yr

* All load reductions are examples and do not represent actual Region V or STEPL calculations.

** E. coli reductions are not easily modeled. However, BMPs known to reduce E. coli should be listed and pollutant reductions from those BMPs, but associated with other pollutants, included in the figure.

Action Register & Schedule

The Action Register is a figure displaying each goal’s scheduled objectives and milestones, estimated financial costs, and possible partners. Examples of how to build an action register are shown with elements 27-29. These are examples to demonstrate how to build the action register and do not need to be included in the WMP. The complete action register figure is shown in element 31 and must be included in the WMP.

27. A series of objectives scheduled to achieve each goal.
  1. Identify specific objectives designed to achieve the goals determined in element 22. The objectives should incorporate the BMPs or measures listed in element 25.
  2. Identify a target audience(s) for each goal’s objectives.

Example:

TSS Goal Statement:

Excess TSS has been identified as a problem. We want to reduce the watershed’s TSS load from 100 tons/year to 25 tons/year (a 75% reduction) within 20 years.

TSS Goal Indicator:

Water Quality and Social data will be used as indicators to show progress toward attaining this goal. The environmental indicator will be TSS testing conducted at each site on a monthly basis for 30 months once the implementation phase is complete. The social indicator will be surveys that measure the behavior changes created through our education program.

Action Register for TSS Goal:

  • Objective: Develop Sediment Education Program for Farmers and Developers
    • Target Audience:
      • Agricultural (AG) Landowners and Operators;
      • Contractors and Developers
  • Objective: Implement No-Till on 1,000 Acres
    • Target Audience:
      • Agricultural (AG) Landowners and Operators
28. Interim measurable milestones for determining whether each objective is being implemented according to the schedule.

Milestones are needed for every goal’s objectives. Milestones scheduled during the early stages of implementation must be specific and focused on clearly outlining how the objective will be achieved. Milestones scheduled during the later stages of implementation may be less specific and focused on maintaining the direction of the project: i.e. monitoring, securing funding, updating data, adapting to new circumstances, and updating the WMP.

Example:

TSS Goal Statement:

Excess TSS has been identified as a problem. We want to reduce the watershed’s TSS load from 100 tons/year to 25 tons/year (a 75% reduction) within 20 years.

TSS Goal Indicator:

Water Quality and Social data will be used as indicators to show progress toward attaining this goal. The environmental indicator will be TSS testing conducted at each site on a monthly basis for 30 months once the implementation phase is complete. The social indicator will be surveys that measure the behavior changes created through our education program.

Action Register for TSS Goal:

  • Objective: Develop Sediment Educational Program for Farmers and Developers
    • Target Audience:
      • AG Landowners and Operators;
      • Contractors and Developers
    • Milestone:
      • Within 6 months of implementation starting, develop a survey that determines barriers to farmers and developers utilizing sediment reduction practices
      • By end of year 1, develop two educational programs--one for farmers and one for developers--based on survey results
      • By end of year 2, find source for donated radio and TV PSA time
      • By end of year 4, resurvey watershed
      • By end of year 5, reevaluate education program
      • On a 5 year cycle, continue to educate and reevaluate
  • Objective: Implement No-Till on 1,000 Acres
    • Target Audience:
      • AG Landowners and Operators
    • Milestone:
      • By 3rd month of implementation, develop a 319 cost share program
      • By 6th month of implementation, be using existing SWCD/NRCS educational materials to inform landowners about no-till
      • By end of year 1, identify non-319 sources of no-till financial assistance
      • Every year, using all known funding sources, implement 200 acres of no-till
      • Once implementation is complete, monitor TSS to measure possible reductions
29. An estimate of financial cost (in dollar amount) for each objective.

Financial cost estimates are necessary to determine the estimated cost of implementing the WMP. Financial cost estimates are expected for BMPs and educational/outreach activities, salary, promotional costs, technical costs, travel, training, etc.

Example:

TSS Goal Statement:

Excess TSS has been identified as a problem. We want to reduce the watershed’s TSS load from 100 tons/year to 25 tons/year (a 75% reduction) within 20 years.

TSS Goal Indicator:

Water Quality and Social data will be used as indicators to show progress toward attaining this goal. The environmental indicator will be TSS testing conducted at each site on a monthly basis for 30 months once the implementation phase is complete. The social indicator will be surveys that measure the behavior changes created through our education program.

Action Register for TSS Goal:

  • Objective: Develop Sediment Educational Program for Farmers and Developers
    • Target Audience:
      • AG Landowners and Operators;
      • Contractors and Developers
    • Milestone:
      • Within 6 months of implementation starting, develop a survey that determines barriers to farmers and developers utilizing sediment reduction practices
        • Cost: $1,000
      • By end of year 1, develop two educational programs--one for farmers and one for developers--based on survey results
        • Cost: $2,500
      • By end of year 2, find source for donated radio and TV PSA time
        • Cost: $1,700
      • By end of year 4, resurvey watershed
        • Cost: $1,000
      • By end of year 5, reevaluate education program
        • Cost: $3,000
      • On a 5 year cycle, continue to educate and reevaluate
        • Cost: $7,000/5 year cycle
  • Objective: Implement No-Till on 1,000 Acres
    • Target Audience:
      • AG Landowners and Operators
    • Milestone:
      • By 3rd month of implementation, develop a 319 cost share program
        • Cost: $500
      • By 6th month of implementation, be using existing SWCD/NRCS educational materials to inform landowners about no-till
        • Cost: 3/4 of a full time staff, $10,000/year
      • By end of year 1, identify non-319 sources of no-till financial assistance
        • Cost: Volunteer based
      • Every year, using all known funding sources, implement 200 acres of no-till
        • Cost: Equipment modification costs $2,500 per planter
      • Once implementation is complete, monitor TSS to measure possible reductions
        • Cost: $175/sample
30. Determine possible partners to implement each objective.
31. Technical assistance needed to implement the plan.

Explain the specific type of technical assistance needed and who will be relied upon to provide it. NRCS's new modeling tool, the Rapid Watershed Assessment, may help watershed groups estimate the amount of technical and financial assistance needed to implement their WMP.

Complete Action Register Example:

TSS Goal Statement:

Excess TSS has been identified as a problem. We want to reduce the watershed’s TSS load from 100 tons/year to 25 tons/year (a 75% reduction) within 20 years.

TSS Goal Indicator:

Water Quality and Social data will be used as indicators to show progress toward attaining this goal. The environmental indicator will be TSS testing conducted at each site on a monthly basis for 30 months once the implementation phase is complete. The social indicator will be surveys that measure the behavior changes created through our education program.

Action Register for TSS Goal:

  • Objective: Develop Sediment Educational Program for Farmers and Developers
    • Target Audience:
      • AG Landowners and Operators;
      • Contractors and Developers
    • Milestone:
      • Within 6 months of implementation starting, develop a survey that determines barriers to farmers and developers utilizing sediment reduction practices
        • Cost: $1,000
        • Possible Partner: Watershed Group
        • Technical Assistance: University to create survey
      • By end of year 1, develop two educational programs--one for farmers and one for developers--based on survey results
        • Cost: $2,500
        • Possible Partner: Watershed Group
      • By end of year 2, find source for donated radio and TV PSA time
        • Cost: $1,700
        • Possible Partner: Watershed Group
      • By end of year 4, resurvey watershed
        • Cost: $1,000
        • Possible Partner: Watershed Group
        • Technical Assistance: University to create survey
      • By end of year 5, reevaluate education program
        • Cost: $3,000
        • Possible Partner: Watershed Group
      • On a 5 year cycle, continue to educate and reevaluate
        • Cost: $7,000/5 year cycle
        • Possible Partner: Watershed Group
        • Technical Assistance: University to create survey
  • Objective: Implement No-Till on 1,000 Acres
    • Target Audience:
      • AG Landowners and Operators
    • Milestone:
      • By 3rd month of implementation, develop a 319 cost share program
        • Cost: $500
        • Possible Partner: Watershed Group
      • By 6th month of implementation, be using existing SWCD/NRCS educational materials to inform landowners about no-till
        • Cost: 3/4 of a full time staff, $10,000/year
        • Possible Partner: Watershed Group
      • By end of year 1, identify non-319 sources of no-till financial assistance
        • Cost: Volunteer based
        • Possible Partner: Watershed Group
      • Every year, using all known funding sources, implement 200 acres of no-till
        • Cost: Equipment modification costs $2,500 per planter, TSP costs $300
        • Possible Partner: Watershed Group
        • Technical Assistance: Steering committee to help discuss program with landowners and TSP to write conservation plans
      • Once implementation is complete, monitor TSS to measure possible reductions
        • Cost: $175/sample
        • Possible Partner: City wastewater plant runs samples
        • Technical Assistance: University monitoring design

Tracking Effectiveness

32. A strategy to track each goal’s indicators and evaluate the effectiveness of the implementation efforts over time.

Water quality indicators need to be tracked through monitoring, modeling load reductions, or other method that documents environmental change. Social and administrative indicators can be tracked through databases, surveys, marketing tools, or other methods. Ensure that the method used to track your indicators is explained and the cost, tracking schedule, possible partners, and technical assistance needed are included within the WMP. Example: Water quality indicators will be tracked using the same methodology we used to collect water quality data for this WMP, however parameters will be limited to those identified in our goals. Data collection will begin 12 months after the first implementation phase ends and will be performed by our partners at the wastewater treatment plant and university for a cost between $10,000 and $15,000.

33. A description of future WMP activity.

A WMP is a living document which requires periodic updates as water quality and landuse change and BMPs and measures are implemented. Determine criteria for when the plan will be revised. Provide a short description of when the WMP will be re-evaluated and who will be responsible for the re-evaluating and making the revisions or adaptations of the plan. If a NPS TMDL is developed after the WMP is finished, the plan will need to be amended to be consistent with the load allocations in the NPS TMDL. Include contact information for questions about the WMP.

Glossary

6217

Requirements designed to improve water quality by strengthening the link between federal and state coastal zone management programs and 319 programs. 6217 is administered by the Indiana Department of Natural Resources Lake Michigan Coastal Program.

Animal Feeding Operation (AFO)

An AFO is an agricultural operation where animals are kept and raised in confined situations. It is a lot or facility (other than an aquatic animal production facility) where the following conditions are met:
  1. Animals have been, are, or will be stabled or confined and fed or maintained for a total of 45 days or more in any 12-month period, and
  2. Crops, vegetation, forage growth, or post-harvest residues are not sustained in the normal growing season over any portion of the lot or facility.
Cause

A cause is an event, agent, or series of actions that produces an effect. Within the realm of this document, that effect is known as a problem. Causes of water quality problems must be defined as a specific pollutant parameter. It is appropriate for some causes and problems to be identical.

Concern

A concern is an issue or topic that a stakeholder believes is relevant to the watershed. All concerns need to be documented and, through the planning process, the steering committee will decide which concerns should be focused on, which concerns are not actual problems, and which are outside the scope of their project. It is appropriate that some concerns and problems will be identical.

Concentrated Animal Feeding Operation (CAFO)

A CAFO is an operation that must meet the definition of an AFO before it can be defined or designated as a CAFO. Previous U.S. EPA regulations based the definition of CAFOs on the number of "animal units" confined. U.S. EPA no longer uses the term "animal unit," but instead refers to the actual number of animals at the operation to define a CAFO. View a brief summary here of how the regulations define Large, Medium, and Small CAFOs [PDF]. The NPDES program regulates the discharge of pollutants from point sources to waters of the United States. CAFOs are point sources, as defined by the CWA [Section 502(14)], are issued a State no discharge permit, and are ineligible for Section 319 funding.

Confined Feeding Operation (CFO)

A CFO is an AFO engaged in the confined feeding of at least 300 cattle, or 600 swine or sheep, or 30,000 fowl, such as chickens, turkeys or other poultry. CFOs are issued a State no discharge permit. The IDEM regulates these confined feeding operations, as well as smaller operations which have violated water pollution rules or laws, under IC 13-18-10.

Combined Sewer Overflow (CSO)

A CSO is an event where the discharge of untreated human and industrial sewage and storm water into local waterways occurs because the capacity of a combined storm/sanitary sewer system is exceeded by local runoff.

Critical Area

Critical Areas are defined area(s) where WMP implementation can remediate NPS sources in order to improve water quality and are defined areas where WMP implementation can mitigate the impact of future sources in order to protect water quality.

Data

Data is any and all information collected, gathered, or brought together as part of the Watershed Inventory’s Second Part.

Describe

To describe or give a description of something means to discuss its relative distribution within the watershed. An acceptable description will verbally illustrate a concern, problem, cause, or source as located in a particular part of the watershed or along specific streams or stream reaches. To describe something does not mean to simply state that it exists within a watershed. When mapping items that are described, highlight their general location on the map. Do not attempt to pinpoint every occurrence.

Desktop Survey

A method of collecting watershed field information using desktop tools such as maps, existing reports and plans, GIS, mapping software such as Google Maps and Google Earth, and the internet. The purpose of the desktop survey is to help describe and quantify information pertaining to stakeholder concerns. Examples of collected information may include: miles of unbuffered streams, number of animal operations, location of Combined Sewer Overflows (CSOs), and location of dams and other hydromodifications. Often, a desktop survey will be combined with a windshield survey, the general knowledge of a steering committee, and other data sources to help describe and quantify watershed characteristics. Desktop surveys are referred to as a “Tier One” collection method in the Watershed Inventory Workbook for Indiana.

Figure

A figure is a chart, table, or graph that presents information. Figures must have a title and a number assigned to them. All figures shall be listed in the Table of Contents by title and number. Figures must be legible.

Geographic Information System (GIS)

A GIS is an organized collection of computer hardware, software, and geographic data designed to efficiently capture, store, update, manipulate, analyze, and display all forms of geographically referenced information. There are several sites where the public can access GIS layers and produce maps using GIS (see Resources).

Hydrologic Unit Code (HUC)

A HUC is a watershed designation system created by the United State Geological Survey (USGS) to identify each drainage basin in the US from largest smallest. The USGS uses a series of digits to label each HUC. The smaller a HUC, the more digits in its label. IDEM only funds groups working at the 8, 10, and 12 digit HUC scale.

IDEM Load Calculation Tool

The IDEM Load Calculation Tool is a simple spreadsheet that calculates mass-based pollutant loads for individual sampling events. It is not designed to calculate aggregate loads across a watershed or even at individual sites over time.

Indicator

An indicator is a parameter or criteria that can be measured to determine whether substantial progress is being made towards achieving a goal.

Long Term Hydrologic Impact Assessment (L-THIA)

L-THIA is an analysis tool that provides site-specific estimates of changes in runoff, recharge and nonpoint source pollution resulting from past or proposed landuse changes.

Map

A map is a spatial representation of information. All maps must have a title and a number assigned to them and not be smaller than 40 square inches. All maps will be listed in the Table of Contents by title and number. In addition, all maps must have a legend, scale, north arrow. Mapped population centers, major streams, and major roads must be labeled. Maps created by editing existing maps can be used in the WMP. Existing maps are discussed in the Resources section of the instructions. Original GIS maps can be produced by the project sponsor, their subcontractor, or partners and in addition to the requirements above, must show subwatershed boundaries. IDEM reserves the right to request additional layers be added to maps.

The WMP instructions ask for several maps. IDEM can assist groups with finding mapping resources. The use of GIS is not mandatory. There are several methods which will allow you to use and edit existing maps for your WMP. Existing electronic maps, for instance, can be copied into a Word document so additional text and symbols can be added to it. Hard copy maps can also be manually edited and scanned into the WMP. IDEM’s GIS Specialist can provide you with more information. Maps created by editing existing maps must, at a minimum, have a legend, scale, and north arrow and label, population centers, streams, and major roads. The following are websites which can provide map layers.

Measure

A measure is an action, activity, program, or event that will help a project achieve its objectives. Examples of measures include educational events, workshops, field days, surveys, and brochures.

Methodology

Methodology refers to the way in which information is found or something is done. The methodology includes the methods, procedures, and techniques used to collect.

Milestone

A milestone is a step that shows the objective’s BMPs and measures are being implemented on a schedule that will allow the objective to be reached and the goal accomplished. Milestones are not changes in water quality.

Municipal Separate Storm Sewer System (MS4)

MS4 is a conveyance or system of conveyances (sewers, roads with drainage systems, municipal streets, catch basins, curbs, gutters, ditches, man-made channels, storm drains) that is usually owned or operated by a city, county, or association. Population areas of a certain size must have an IDEM approved MS4 plan that details, through six different measures, how storm water pollution will be minimized within the MS4 area.

Objective

An objective is a specific and focused strategy that if achieved will help a project achieve its goals. Examples of objectives include installing BMPs, completing measures, securing funding, and organizing a volunteer base.

Plate

A plate is a photograph or other image. Plates must have a title and a number assigned to them. All plates will be listed in the Table of Contents by title and number. Plates must not be smaller than 9 square inches.

Problem

A problem is an issue that exists due to one or more of the concerns. Problems build on concerns by formally stating a condition or action that needs to be changed, improved, or investigated further. It is appropriate that some concerns and problems will be identical.

Quantify

To quantify something means to provide a reasonable estimate of its magnitude. The magnitude must be expressed numerically or as a unit of measurement (acreage, miles, etc.). To quantify something does not mean to express its magnitude with adjectives such as common or sparse.

Region 5 Load Estimation Spreadsheet Model

The Region 5 Model is an Excel workbook that provides a gross estimate of sediment and nutrient load reductions from the implementation of agricultural and urban BMPs.

Rule 5

Rule 5 is a performance-based regulation designed to reduce pollutants that are associated with construction and/or land disturbing activities that disturb one acre or more. It overlaps with the MS4 rule in that, the MS4 rule requires MS4 entities to develop ordinances for the Construction and Post-Construction MCMs, and those ordinances must meet the minimum requirements of 327 IAC 15-5 (Rule 5). Rule 5 applies statewide, but the ordinances developed by the MS4s are specific to each MS4 jurisdictional area. Section 319 funds cannot be spent on Rule 5 requirements unless the proposed project is above and beyond the rule’s requirements.

Spreadsheet Tool for Estimating Pollutant Load (STEPL)

STEPL is a tool that computes watershed surface runoff; nutrient loads, including nitrogen, phosphorus, and 5-day biological oxygen demand (BOD5); and sediment delivery based on various landuses and management practices.

Sanitary Sewer Overflow (SSO)

An SSO is a condition whereby untreated sewage is illegally discharged into the environment, without undergoing wastewater treatment.

Source

A source is an activity, material, or structure that results in a cause of nonpoint source pollution. Sources should be described in enough detail to show the part of the watershed where they occur and, when applicable, what their magnitude is across the watershed.

Stakeholder

A stakeholder is a person (or group) who is responsible for making or implementing a management recommendation, who will be affected by the recommendation, or who can aid or prevent its implementation.

Subwatershed

A subwatershed, for the purposes of this document, is a watershed with a 12 digit Hydrologic Unit Code (HUC).

Target

A target is the desired measurable level of a water quality or habitat/biological parameter that your group has decided streams in the watershed should meet.

U.S. EPA, Handbook for Developing Watershed Plans to Restore and Protect Our Waters

A comprehensive guide published by U.S. EPA outlining that agency’s 9 required elements as well as tools and ideas pertinent to successful watershed planning.

Urban Retrofit Plan

An urban retrofit plan is a strategy within an urban or suburban environment to add storm water retrofits with water quality features to existing BMPs or storm water infrastructure.

Windshield Survey

A method of collecting watershed field information by driving the watershed (or parts of it) and observing areas or practices of concern. The purpose of the windshield survey is to describe and quantify information pertaining to stakeholder concerns. Examples of collected information may include: miles of unbuffered streams, number of animal operations, location of Combined Sewer Overflows (CSOs), and location of dams and other hydromodifications. Often, a windshield survey will be combined with a desktop survey, the general knowledge of a steering committee, and other data sources to help describe and quantify watershed characteristics. Windshield surveys are referred to as a “Tier Two” collection method in the Watershed Inventory Workbook for Indiana [PDF].