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Indiana Department of Natural Resources

Historic Preservation & Archaeology > Involving Others > Certified Local Governments Certified Local Governments

Monroe County Courthouse
Monroe County Courthouse
Bloomington, IN

The Certified Local Government (CLG) Program helps Indiana cities and towns create, promote, and maintain preservation efforts in coordination with their development plans. Indiana currently has eighteen CLGs: Bloomington, Crown Point, Elkhart, Evansville, Fort Wayne, Huntington, Lafayette, LaPorte, Logansport, Mishawaka, Muncie, Nappanee, New Albany, Newburgh, Richmond, South Bend, Monroe County (excluding the incorporated city of Bloomington), and St. Joseph County (excluding the incorporated cities of South Bend and Mishawaka).

The designation "Certified Local Government" is intended to denote that a municipality meets certain state and federal qualifications and therefore "certified" to carry out specific regulatory and administrative preservation activities at the local level. To become certified, a city or town must maintain an active and qualified historic preservation commission and commission staff, enforce state and local legislation for the designation and protection of local properties, maintain an up-to-date inventory of historic properties within its jurisdiction, participate in the nomination of local properties to the National Register, and provide for public participation in its meetings and activities.

The state benefits from this program because CLGs undertake at the local level certain preservation duties and activities that would otherwise be conducted by the Division, thereby reducing the DHPA's workload. For example, these communities can carry out the substantive review of National Register nominations, and certain communities may conduct Section 106 Reviews for projects within their jurisdiction.

CLG communities benefit from participation in this program by retaining a degree of local autonomy over National Register and Section 106 issues, receiving technical assistance and training from the Division, and receiving a competitive advantage in applying for federal grants from the Division. Federal guidelines require that at least 10% of each state's annual Historic Preservation Fund (HPF) allocation be disbursed to CLG communities. In an average year, the DHPA distributes about 20% of its annual HPF award to CLG communities. The DHPA is currently working to expand the CLG program, particularly in the central and southern portions of the state.