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Indiana Department of Natural Resources

DNR Home > Divisions > Communications > Outdoor Indiana Magazine - Archives > Outdoor Indiana - November/December 2011 > Outdoor Indiana - November/December 2011 - Featured Stories Outdoor Indiana - November/December 2011 - Featured Stories

News & Notes
Creature Feature
Conservation Hall of Fame

News & Notes

Reforest Indiana for a 10-spot

In the December entry of his book “A Sand County Almanac,” conservationist Aldo Leopold wrote about the opportunity everyone has to create nature.

“Acts of creation are ordinarily reserved for gods and poets, but humbler folk may circumvent this restriction if they know how. To plant a pine, for example, one need be neither god nor poet; one need only own a good shovel. ... If his back be strong and his shovel sharp, there may eventually be ten thousand.”

How about one million trees?

That’s the goal of the Indiana Tree Project, a joint effort of the Indiana Natural Resources Foundation and the DNR Division of Forestry. The project offers everyone the opportunity to perform “acts of creation” as Leopold suggests.

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Creature Feature

Red Fox (Vulpes vulpes)
By Don Kaczorowski

A fox keeps an eye on threats to its den in spring 2011 in Lafayette. Foxes often build their dens and raise young in urban areas, which lessens the threats from coyotes, their main predator.Animals don’t generally appear in popular sayings such as “sly like a fox” without good reason.

One of the more clever animals in Indiana, the red fox, got its reputation nationwide by sneaking into chicken coops and feasting. At least that’s the legend.

The red fox is nocturnal, although it still roams a lot during the day. Fairly common in Indiana, it has been spotted in all 92 counties. Because red foxes are resourceful, urban areas such as Indianapolis often have a large population.

“Usually found in un-forested areas, such as old fields and farmland, foxes can adapt to new environments quickly,” said Jarrett Manek, interpretive naturalist at O’Bannon Woods State Park.

A fox keeps an eye on threats to its den in spring 2011 in Lafayette. Foxes often build their dens and raise young in urban areas, which lessens the threats from coyotes, their main predator.

To read the rest of this article subscribe to Outdoor Indiana or pick up a copy at most Barnes and Noble bookstores, and state park inns. To subscribe, click here or call (317) 233-3046.

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Conservation Hall of Fame

The third class of first class
By Phil Bloom

Conservation Hall of Fame inductee Durward Allen takes in the scenic view from Greenstone Ridge at Isle Royale National Park in Michigan in this 1958 photo by David Mech. Allen, a Purdue University professor, launched a wolf-moose research study on the island that year with Mech as his first graduate student for the project.It might seem that a person who has two high schools, two middle schools, two buildings at major universities, a research ship, a river, and more than two dozen fish species named after him has had more than his share of accolades.

Perhaps so, but David Starr Jordan has a new honor, if only posthumously, for his already lengthy resume—inductee to the Indiana Conservation Hall of Fame.

Jordan (1851-1931) was one of eight members added to the Hall of Fame during a luncheon ceremony Oct. 17 at the Indiana State Museum, bringing the Hall’s roster to 33 individuals and one family.

The other inductees in the third Hall of Fame class were Durward Allen, a Purdue University professor and wildlife researcher; William “Bill” Barnes, first director of DNR Nature Preserves; Louie H. Dunten, an officer with the Izaak Walton League of America at the state or national level for more than 40 years; Richard Ford, philanthropist and historic preservationist; Kenn Kaufman, prolific author of popular bird and butterfly field guides; Ian Rolland, longtime leader with Indiana Heritage Trust, Indiana Natural Resources Foundation, and The Nature Conservancy; and legendary outdoor writer “Bayou” Bill Scifres.

Conservation Hall of Fame inductee Durward Allen takes in the scenic view from Greenstone Ridge at Isle Royale National Park in Michigan in this 1958 photo by David Mech. Allen, a Purdue University professor, launched a wolf-moose research study on the island that year with Mech as his first graduate student for the project.

To read the rest of this article subscribe to Outdoor Indiana or pick up a copy at most Barnes and Noble bookstores, and state park inns. To subscribe, click here or call (317) 233-3046.

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