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Bureau of Motor Vehicles

myBMV > Learner's Permits and Driver's Licenses > Driver's Manual > Updates to 2012 Driver’s License Manual Updates to 2012 Driver’s License Manual

Below are the page numbers and title headings for portions of the July 2012 driver’s manual that were updated in July 2013. The updates are shown in red. Please make note of them before taking the knowledge or driving tests.

You can download the July 2013 driver’s manual here. The updated manual already contains these updates.

Page 3- New Indiana Residents

When you become a resident of Indiana, you have 60 days to obtain a new Indiana driver’s license if you hold a valid driver’s license from another state.

If you do not have a valid driver’s license from another state, you must hold an Indiana learner’s permit before you may apply for a driver’s license.

If your out-of-state license has been expired for not more than three years, you must pass a standard vision screening test and a knowledge test to obtain an Indiana license.

If your out-of-state license has been expired for more than three years, you must pass a standard vision screening test, a written knowledge test, and a driving skills test to obtain an Indiana license.

If you have held an out-of-state license for at least 180 days, you must pass a standard vision screening test and a knowledge test to obtain an Indiana license.

If you have held an out-of-state license for less than 180 days, you must pass a standard vision screening test and a knowledge test to obtain an Indiana Learner’s Permit.

Page 4 - Driver’s Licenses

Driver’s licenses provide full driving privileges to Indiana residents who are 18 years of age or older. Probationary driver’s licenses provide restricted driving privileges to Indiana residents who are younger than 18 years of age.

An Indiana operator’s license does not allow the holder to drive for hire, transport passengers for hire, or transport property for hire, in any vehicle with a gross vehicle weight rating of 16,000 pounds or more.

Page 5 - Driver’s License Age Requirements

You must hold an Indiana learner’s permit for 180 days to obtain a driver’s license.

You must be at least 16 years and 270 days old to obtain a driver’s license.

If you have passed an approved driver education program, you must be at least 16 years and 180 days old to obtain a driver’s license.

In addition, if you are applying for a driver’s license, you must complete at least 50 hours of supervised driving practice with a licensed instructor or a licensed driver, with valid driving privileges, who is at least 25 years old, or a spouse with valid driving privileges who is at least 21 years old. At least 10 hours of supervised driving practice must be nighttime driving. At the time of application for the driver’s license you must submit a completed log showing proof of the hours driven.  The log must be signed by a parent or legal guardian if the applicant is under 18.

 

Driver Education Waiver

If you have a learner’s permit and attend an approved driver education school that participates in the BMV waiver program, you may take the driving skills test with the school after successful completion of the course. You may also choose to be given the driving skills test by a BMV driver examiner when you apply for a driver’s license at a license branch.

Only one driving skills test may be administered by a school prior to any BMV driving skills test. Once a driving skills test is taken with the school, you may not return to the school for subsequent skills testing.

You must take the driving skills test at a license branch if any of the following situations occur:

  • Your driver education learner’s permit expires; or
  • You receive a failing grade of 79 percent or below in either classroom instruction or behind-the-wheel training in your driver education school; or
  • Your driver education school does not participate in the BMV’s driving skills test waiver program.

The period of time you hold any valid Indiana learner’s permit counts toward the required 180 day holding period.

 

Page 7 - Learner’s Permit Driving Privileges

If you obtain a learner’s permit when you are younger than 16 years of age you may practice driving only after you begin an approved driver education program.

If you have a learner’s permit for driver education, you may drive only when you are accompanied by a certified driving instructor in the front seat of a vehicle equipped with dual brake controls, or when a licensed driver with valid driving privileges who is 25 years of age or older, or a spouse with valid driving privileges who is 21 years of age and older, is seated in your vehicle’s front passenger seat.

If you are between the ages of 16 years and 18 years and you are not enrolled in a driver education program, you may practice driving with a learner’s permit only when a licensed driver with valid driving privileges who is 25 years of age or older, or a spouse with valid driving privileges who is 21 years of age or older, is seated in your vehicle’s front passenger seat.

If you are 18 years of age or older, you may practice driving with a learner’s permit only when accompanied by a licensed driver with valid driving privileges who is 21 years of age or older.

 

Page 8 - Driving with Passengers

You may not drive with any passengers for 180 days after you obtain your probationary driver’s license unless one of the following individuals is seated in your vehicle’s front passenger seat:

  • A licensed individual with valid driving privileges who is 25 years of age or older; or

  • Your spouse with valid driving privileges who is 21 years of age or older; A certified driver education instructor.

  • However, during the 180 days after you get your probationary driver’s license you may drive with your child, step-child, sibling, step or half sibling or spouse during the hours allowed by law.

 

Page 9 - When You May Drive with a Probationary Driver’s License

For 180 days after obtaining your probationary driver’s license, you may not drive between 10 p.m. and 5 a.m.

After you have driven for 180 days with a probationary driver’s license, you may not drive during the following hours:

Sunday through Thursday, after 11 p.m.

Monday through Friday, before 5 a.m.

Saturday and Sunday, between 1 a.m. and 5 a.m.

You may drive during the periods described above if :

  • You are participating in, going to, or returning from:
    • Lawful employment;
    • A school-sanctioned activity; or
    • A religious event; or
  • You are accompanied by an individual with valid driving privileges who is at least 25 years of age, or your spouse with valid driving privileges who is at least 21 years of age.

Page 10 - Written Knowledge Test

The knowledge test is based on information contained in this driver’s manual. To pass the knowledge test, you must demonstrate a basic understanding of Indiana traffic laws and safe driving techniques, and you must be able to read and understand highway signs regulating, warning, and directing traffic. Knowledge tests include multiple choice questions concerning traffic maneuvers and knowledge of types of traffic signs.

The knowledge test is required for the following individuals: Learner’s permit applicants.

  • First-time chauffeur’s license applicants.
  • First-time public passenger chauffeur’s license applicants.
  • Drivers younger than 21 years of age renewing a valid driver’s license and have active points on their driving record.
  • New Indiana residents who hold an out-of-state license of any type and are applying for an Indiana driver’s license.
  • Drivers whose Indiana driver’s license has been expired for more than 180 days.
  • Drivers who have six or more active points on their Indiana driving record.
  • Active duty military personnel and the spouse and/or dependent, if applicable, whose Indiana driver’s license has been expired for more than 180 days and who have been returned from deployment for more than 90 days.
  • Out-of-state active military personnel applying for a new Indiana driver’s license.

If you fail to pass a written knowledge test, you must wait until the next business day to take the test again.

 

Page 11 - Driving Skills Test

You must schedule an appointment for the driving skills test online at myBMV.com or by visiting an Indiana license branch. There is no charge for the driving skills test administered by the BMV driver examiner, but you must provide your own vehicle.

The driving skills test is required by a BMV driver examiner for the following:

  • Driver with an Indiana learner’s permit, unless that driver qualifies for the driver education skills test waiver.
  • New Indiana resident who has held an out-of-state driver’s license for less than 180 days or whose out-of-state driver’s license has been expired more than three years.
  • New Indiana resident who holds an out-of-country license.
  • Indiana resident whose Indiana driver’s license has been expired more than three years. 
  • Driver who has a BMV restriction that requires testing.
  • Driver about whom the BMV has received a medical complaint and the Indiana BMV’s medical board has recommended a skills evaluation.
  • Active duty military personnel and the spouse and/or dependent, if applicable, whose Indiana driver’s license has been expired for more than three years and who have been returned from deployment for more than 90 days.
  • Discharged military personnel who hold an out-of-state license, and the expiration of the license is beyond the allowed extension, and the out-of-state license has been expired for more than three years.

 

Page 13 - Vision Screening Test

All applicants for an Indiana driver’s license or permit are required to pass the state’s minimum vision standards, even if the applicant is renewing an existing license.

If you normally wear glasses or contacts while driving, you should advise the branch personnel and wear them during the vision test. If your visual ability does not meet state standards, you will be referred to an eye doctor for examination. If you return to the license branch with a statement from an eye doctor affirming that your vision has been corrected to meet the state standard you may continue the licensing or renewal process, which will include a vision test at the license branch.

Restrictions may be placed on a driver’s license for a variety of reasons. These restrictions allow a driver to operate a vehicle under conditions that ensure safety to the driver and to the public.

The most common restrictions are based on vision screening tests. They appear in the lower left-hand corner of the driver’s license and are described on the back of the license.

Some of the common restrictions placed on licenses due to vision include:

  • Restriction B: glasses or contact lenses required when driving.

  • Restriction F: outside rearview mirrors required when driving.

  • Restriction G: daylight driving only.

 

Page 14 - Restrictions for Drivers Who Read Without Glasses

  • Both eyes are 20/20 to 20/40: No restrictions.
  • One eye is 20/20 to 20/40 and other eye is 20/50 to blind: Restriction F.

 

Restrictions for Drivers Who Read With Glasses

  • One eye is 20/20 to 20/40 and other eye is 20/50 to blind: Restrictions B and F.
  • Both eyes are 20/50: Restriction B.
  • One eye is 20/50 and other eye is 20/70 to blind: Restrictions B, F, and G.
  • Both eyes are 20/70: Restrictions B, F, and G.

 

Page 15 - Other Driver’s License or ID Restrictions

Other driver’s license restrictions include:

B – Glasses or Contact Lenses

2 –HTV Conditional

C – Mechanical Aid/Adaptive Device

3 – Photo Exempt

D – Prosthetic Aid

5 – Conditional – Operate Under Specific Conditions

F – Outside Rearview Mirror

6 – Interlock Device

G – Daylight Driving Only

7 – Seat Belt Exempt

J – Driver Education, Specific Limitations

8 – Medical Condition

 

9 – Temporary Lawful Resident

 

CDL Restrictions:

E – Auto Transmission CMV

R – Valid For Restricted Agricultural CDL Privileges Only When Presented With Season Validation Document

K – Intrastate Only

L – No Air Brake CMV

M – No Class A Pass Vehicle

T – Hazmat Prohibited

N – No Class A/B Pass Vehicle

V – Medical Variance Document Required

O – No Tractor – Trailer CMV

W – Farm Waiver

Q – Bus Only

Z – No Full Airbrake CMV

 

Chauffeur’s Licenses

An Indiana chauffeur’s license grants the holder all the privileges of a driver’s license. In addition, the holder of a chauffeur’s license is permitted to operate vehicles with a gross vehicle weight rating of at least 16,000 pounds but not more than 26,000 pounds (whether single vehicle or combined gross vehicle weight) when used to transport property for hire. To operate a vehicle with a gross vehicle weight rating of 26,001 pounds or more you must have a commercial driver’s license.

 

Page 17 - Chauffeur’s/Public Passenger Chauffeur’s License Validity

A chauffeur’s license is valid for six years if you are younger than 75 years of age when you obtain the license, for three years if you are 75 to 85 years old when you obtain the license, or for two years if you are 85 years of age or older when you obtain the license.

A public passenger chauffeur’s license is valid for four years if you are younger than 75 years of age when you obtain the license or for 2 years if you are at least 75 years of age.

Chauffeur’s licenses and public passenger chauffeur’s licenses issued to lawful temporary residents may not reflect standard periods of validity.

 

Commercial Driver’s License

An Indiana commercial driver’s license permits the holder to operate commercial motor vehicles, or combinations of vehicles such as semi-tractor trailers, with declared gross vehicle weight ratings in excess of 26,000 pounds; vehicles designed or used to transport 16 or more people, including the driver; and vehicles used to transport hazardous materials.

Requirements for the commercial driver’s license are stricter than those for any other Indiana driver’s license and are based upon stringent Federal Motor Carrier safety regulations.

A commercial driver’s license is not available to lawful temporary residents.

 

Page 21 - Motorcycle Endorsement Validity

A motorcycle endorsement is valid for the same period as the license type.

 

Page 24 - Unlicensed Driver

Any unlicensed driver convicted of two traffic violations within 24 months of each other will be denied license issuance for one year from the latest conviction. If a driver is issued a license before the BMV is informed of a conviction that occurred prior to the credential issuance, the BMV will suspend the driving privileges of the customer for one year. Customers will not be denied issuance of an identification card due to these reasons.

 

CHAPTER TWO

Page 25 - Renewing, Amending, or Replacing A Credential

Your Indiana driver’s license, permit, or identification card is valid for a period of time, after which you must renew it. If you lose your credential or it is stolen, you may replace it at an Indiana license branch or if you are outside of Indiana and meet certain requirements you may obtain an interim credential until you return to Indiana. Customers meeting certain requirements may renew or replace their licenses or identification cards online at myBMV.com. Visit myBMV.com for a listing of those requirements. If your name or address changes, you must visit a license branch to amend the information on your credential.

 

Page 28 - Driver Safety Programs

The BMV’s driver safety program includes defensive driving curriculum available through classroom instruction, online, or by DVD/video. A BMV-approved driver safety program provides an excellent summary of defensive driving techniques and is a useful refresher course for drivers. As an incentive to those who complete the course, a four-point credit will appear on their Indiana driver records for three years. This credit may only be applied once every three years.

Any person may sign up for a driver safety program. However, every individual who commits two or more traffic offenses resulting in convictions during a 12-month period MUST attend a driver safety program. Drivers who are under 18 years of age are required to complete a DSP if, within a 12-month period, they are convicted of two or more traffic offenses, involved in two or more accidents, or a combination of the two. Failure to complete the course within the specified time period will result in the suspension of the individual’s driving privileges.

 

A judge has the authority to order a driver who commits a traffic violation to attend a driver safety program. If a court orders you to take a driver safety program, the court may require classroom instruction only. Failure to complete the program or pay the fee within the specified time period may result in the suspension of the driver’s driving privileges. The four-point credit will not be applied to the driver record if the driver safety program is not BMV-approved.

The maximum fee for any driver safety program is $55.00. Allow seven to 10 working days for results to be processed. Make your check or money order payable to the driver safety program.

The BMV has approved a limited number of driver safety programs. A list of these programs is available at myBMV.com or by calling 888-692-6841.

 

Page 29 - Proof of Financial Responsibility (Insurance)

Your insurance company must electronically provide proof of financial responsibility to the BMV for the motor vehicle involved in any of the following situations:

  • An auto accident for which the BMV receives an accident report; or
  • A traffic ticket within one year of receiving two other traffic tickets; or
  • A serious traffic violation such as a misdemeanor or felony; or
  • Any traffic violation by a driver who was previously suspended for failing to provide proof of financial responsibility.

If any of the preceding situations occur, a request for proof of financial responsibility will be sent to you. You must then arrange for your insurance agent to complete a Certificate of Compliance proving that the vehicle was insured, or that you were insured to operate the vehicle, at the time of the accident or the violation; the certificate must be submitted electronically to the BMV within 40 days of receiving the BMV’s request. Failure to electronically submit the certificate within 40 days will result in your driving privileges being suspended. Once your driving privileges are suspended, you may have the suspension removed from your driver record by having your insurance company electronically provide proof of financial responsibility covering the date of the incident and the vehicle involved.

If your driving privileges are suspended upon conviction of certain major offenses, your insurance company must electronically submit proof of future financial responsibility with an SR-22 form in order for you to be reinstated.

The SR-22 form proves that you have an automobile insurance policy that cannot be cancelled without prior notice, and the form must be filed with the BMV for three years. If the BMV receives a cancellation notice or does not have a current SR-22 on file at any time during the three-year period, your driving privileges will be suspended.

 

Page 30 - Driving Without Insurance

A driver who operates a vehicle without automobile liability insurance policy is subject to a suspension of driving privileges for 90 days. In addition, a driver who is suspended more than one time within a three-year period for failing to provide proof of insurance will incur a one-year suspension. To reinstate driving privileges, the driver’s insurance provider must electronically submit current proof of insurance (SR-50) and pay a reinstatement fee of $150, $225, or $300, depending on whether it is a first, second, third or subsequent suspension.

All drivers who have been suspended following a conviction for operating a vehicle without insurance or who have received an administrative (BMV) suspension for failing to provide proof of financial responsibility will be required to maintain proof of future financial responsibility (Form SR-22) with the BMV for three years following the end of each suspension.

Suspension

Indiana law gives courts the authority to order the BMV to suspend an individual’s driving privileges when he/she is found to have committed certain traffic violations. Suspensions begin 18 days after notice from the BMV is sent to the driver, unless otherwise directed by Indiana law or a court.

Driver Record Access and Reinstatement

Your driver record may be viewed online at no charge on the myBMV.com website. You will be required to establish a myBMV.com personal account. The driver record includes your license status, as well as information about suspensions and how to reinstate your driving privileges. Select “Driver Record” on the left-hand side of the page, then select the “Viewable Driver Record” to see your record. There is also an “Official Driver Record” that may be purchased for $4.00 (see below). If your driving privileges are suspended by a court, the court’s phone number will be listed with the associated court-ordered suspension. You may contact the court to find out how to fulfill the requirements of that particular suspension.

Once the court’s requirements are fulfilled, they will send reinstatement information directly to the BMV for processing. Processing by the BMV may take up to five business days once the information is received from the court.

If your driving privileges are suspended by the BMV, you will have to serve the required suspension time and, in some cases, fulfill BMV reinstatement requirements. You can find these requirements at the top of your “Viewable Driver Record.” Typically, reinstatement requirements include providing proof of current (SR-50) or future (SR-22) financial responsibility and/or paying a reinstatement fee to the BMV. The proof of financial responsibility must be sent electronically from your insurance provider directly to the BMV. You may pay reinstatement fees online at myBMV.com, by telephone at 888- 692-6841 or by mail using the provided reinstatement fee coupon sent to you in the mail. These requirements, along with the date you are eligible for reinstatement, will be listed in the “Reinstatement Requirements” box near the top of the Viewable Driver Record or Official Driver Record. For information regarding the Driver Safety Program, see “Driver Safety Programs” in the previous section(s).

Note: The “Viewable Driver Record” cannot be printed and should not be used as an official transcript of your driver record. The “Official Driver Record” is an official transcript of your driver record for a court, another state agency, employer or for individual use. You will be able to print and save your electronic “Official Driver Record” for 30 days after it is purchased. An electronic version of the “Official Driver Record” also is provided when purchased at myBMV.com.

 

Page 31 - Failure to Appear or Pay Traffic Offenses

Failing to respond to a citation issued by a law enforcement officer or not paying for tickets after a judgment has been rendered may lead to the suspension of your driving privileges. The suspension is indefinite and ends only when the court notifies the BMV that you appeared in court or paid for the offense. 

Operating a Vehicle While Intoxicated

Operating a vehicle while intoxicated or with a blood-alcohol content over the legal limit is a criminal offense and has an immediate and significant effect on your privilege to operate a vehicle.

Common pre-conviction suspensions for operating a vehicle while intoxicated include:

  • Refusal to submit to a certified chemical test. If you refuse to submit to a certified chemical test conducted by a law enforcement officer your driver’s license may be confiscated and your driving privileges may be suspended for up to two years.
  • Failure of a certified chemical test. If you fail a certified chemical test, your driving privileges may be suspended for up to 180 days once the BMV receives an affidavit from a court, containing the results of the failed test.

If you are convicted of operating a motor vehicle while intoxicated or with a blood alcohol content of .08 percent or more, a court is required to suspend your driving privileges for at least 90 days, even if it is your first offense. Suspension periods are longer for repeat offenders.

If you are not a repeat offender, a court may stay the execution of the post-conviction suspension after serving the minimum period required by law and issue an order for a probationary license granting limited driving privileges. A court may also require the installation of an ignition interlock device as a condition of the probationary license. An interlock device mechanically tests your blood alcohol content level before your car can be started.

When a driver who is younger than 18 years of age is cited for operating a vehicle while intoxicated, the Juvenile Court may recommend a suspension of his or her driving privileges.

 

Page 33 - Failure to Pay Child Support

A court that has determined that a parent is delinquent in paying child support may order the BMV to immediately suspend the delinquent parent’s driving privileges indefinitely until the parent begins making payments satisfactory to the court.

If the local agency responsible for enforcing child support payments determines either that a parent failed to appear for a hearing or appeared and was found to be delinquent, then that agency may send an order to the BMV requiring that the parent’s driving privileges be indefinitely suspended in 18 days.

Section A (10-Year Suspension): Two Major Offenses

Resulting In Injury Or Death

An HTV is any person who, within a 10-year period, is convicted of two major offenses resulting in injury or death including:

  • Reckless homicide resulting from operating a motor vehicle.
  • Voluntary or involuntary manslaughter resulting from the operation of a motor vehicle.
  • A driver involved in an accident resulting in death or injury who fails to stop at the scene of the accident to provide information and assistance.
  • Operating a motor vehicle while intoxicated resulting in death.
  • Operating a motor vehicle with a blood alcohol content of .08 percent or more resulting in death.

Drivers who are convicted two times within a 10-year period of operating a motor vehicle while intoxicated resulting in death will have their driving privileges suspended for life.

 

Page 34 - Section B (10-Year Suspension): Three Major Offenses

An HTV is any person who, within a 10-year period, is convicted of three major offenses including:

  • Driving while intoxicated or with a blood alcohol content of .08 percent or more.
  • Driving while the person’s driving privileges are suspended or revoked as a result of the person's conviction of an offense under IC 9-1-4-52 (repealed July 1, 1991), IC 9-24-18-5(b) (repealed July 1, 2000), IC 9-24-19-2, IC 9-24-19-3, or IC 9-24-19-4.
  • Operating a motor vehicle without having obtained a license.
  • Reckless driving.
  • Criminal recklessness involving the operation of a motor vehicle.
  • Drag racing or engaging in a speed contest in violation of the law.
  • Leaving the scene of an accident or failing to notify authorities of an accident when required.
  • Any felony under the Indiana motor vehicle statutes or any felony in the commission of which a motor vehicle is used.
  • Any of the offenses listed in Section A.
  • Drivers who are convicted of three major offenses will have their driving
  • privileges suspended for 10 years.

 

Page 35 - Restriction 2: Probationary License for Habitual Traffic Violator (HTV) Suspensions

A “Restriction 2” is placed on the driver’s license of a person whose HTV suspension or HTV probationary driving privileges has ended or is terminated by court order, or whose lifetime suspension has been rescinded by a court, and who has previously been convicted of operating a motor vehicle while intoxicated. This restriction must remain on the credential of the customer for three years following the expiration date of the suspension or probationary driving privileges. This restriction indicates that this driver is subject to alcohol (chemical) testing if requested by law enforcement who lawfully stops the person while operating a motor vehicle or motorized bicycle. In addition, the person must not operate a motor vehicle or motorized bicycle with a blood alcohol content of .02 percent or more. At the time of application for a credential, the driver will be required to sign an affidavit acknowledging his/her obligation to submit to blood alcohol testing.

 

Page 80 - What To Do After an Accident

Drivers and passengers can be injured anytime, anyplace. That’s why such occurrences are called accidents – an unexpected, unfortunate situation in which one is rarely prepared. Knowing what to do after an accident can make the experience less frightening and decrease the chance of unnecessary complications.

  • Stop. If you are involved in an accident, you must stop and provide information to others involved in the accident. It is a serious crime to leave the scene of an accident which can result in the suspension of your driving privileges. If the accident results in injury, death, or entrapment, you must also notify law enforcement of the accident.
  • Alert other drivers that an accident has occurred. Turn on your emergency signals or use another means to let people know that there has been an accident.
  • Move to the shoulder of the road if possible. Indiana law states that drivers involved in crashes that do not result in injury or death should not obstruct traffic more than necessary. Off the roadway or on the shoulder is a much safer place to exchange information or wait for law enforcement to arrive. Your insurance coverage will not be compromised if you move your vehicle to the shoulder.

 

APPENDIX B

Page 98 - Teens Behind The Wheel

Driver Guide for Parents and Teens

The Driver Guide For Parents and Teens is posted on our website at myBMV.com. It is an important tool that can be used by everyone to help keep parents engaged in their child’s driver education. It is also available in print and may be obtained at any license branch.